Using a Handling and Familiarization Protocol to Attenuate the Stress Response in an Experimental Rat Model

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159512
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using a Handling and Familiarization Protocol to Attenuate the Stress Response in an Experimental Rat Model
Abstract:
Using a Handling and Familiarization Protocol to Attenuate the Stress Response in an Experimental Rat Model
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Wiersma, Kimberly
P.I. Institution Name:Our Lady of the Resurrection Medical Center
Title:Acute Care Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:5645 West Addison Street, Chicago, IL, 60634, USA
Contact Telephone:773.282.7000
Stress is defined as the effect produced by internal and external factors that alter an animal's biological equilibrium. Stress stimulates sympathetic nervous system activity and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as reflected by increased plasma catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine) and glucocorticoids (cortisol/corticosterone) levels. These signaling molecules alter cardiovascular homeostasis. Therefore, when using animal models to study cardiovascular phenomenon, it is important to control for or eliminate the stress response. It has been hypothesized that handling (H) and familiarization (F) of animals to experimental procedures will attenuate the stress response, although neither intervention has been clearly defined in the literature. This study investigated the effect of a 6-day H/F protocol on the stress response in adult Sprague-Dawley rats and examined the influence of gender. Handling entailed picking up the rat and petting it for 1 minute. Familiarization entailed conducting sham experimental procedures. Control rats were left in their cages. A randomized, four-group experimental design was used. The groups were control males, H and F (H/F) males, control females, and H/F females (n=6-7; each group). Stress variables of heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and weight were measured pre- and post-intervention. A tail-cuff Apollo Blood Pressure Analyzer was used to determine HR and SBP. Plasma corticosterone (analogous to cortisol in humans) and epinephrine were measured post-intervention by radioimmunoassay. Data were analyzed by T-test or ANOVA where appropriate. Primary findings were: 1) there is a gender difference in response to H/F, 2) there is an inconsistent response among variables to H/F, 3) variables that appear to best reflect stress response were HR and weight, and 4) the 6-day H/F protocol did not convincingly decrease the stress response in adult rats and may increase the stress response in female rats. Results may cast doubt on the effectiveness of short-term stress reduction protocols in adult rats.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing a Handling and Familiarization Protocol to Attenuate the Stress Response in an Experimental Rat Modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159512-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using a Handling and Familiarization Protocol to Attenuate the Stress Response in an Experimental Rat Model</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wiersma, Kimberly</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Our Lady of the Resurrection Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Acute Care Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5645 West Addison Street, Chicago, IL, 60634, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">773.282.7000</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Stress is defined as the effect produced by internal and external factors that alter an animal's biological equilibrium. Stress stimulates sympathetic nervous system activity and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as reflected by increased plasma catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine) and glucocorticoids (cortisol/corticosterone) levels. These signaling molecules alter cardiovascular homeostasis. Therefore, when using animal models to study cardiovascular phenomenon, it is important to control for or eliminate the stress response. It has been hypothesized that handling (H) and familiarization (F) of animals to experimental procedures will attenuate the stress response, although neither intervention has been clearly defined in the literature. This study investigated the effect of a 6-day H/F protocol on the stress response in adult Sprague-Dawley rats and examined the influence of gender. Handling entailed picking up the rat and petting it for 1 minute. Familiarization entailed conducting sham experimental procedures. Control rats were left in their cages. A randomized, four-group experimental design was used. The groups were control males, H and F (H/F) males, control females, and H/F females (n=6-7; each group). Stress variables of heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and weight were measured pre- and post-intervention. A tail-cuff Apollo Blood Pressure Analyzer was used to determine HR and SBP. Plasma corticosterone (analogous to cortisol in humans) and epinephrine were measured post-intervention by radioimmunoassay. Data were analyzed by T-test or ANOVA where appropriate. Primary findings were: 1) there is a gender difference in response to H/F, 2) there is an inconsistent response among variables to H/F, 3) variables that appear to best reflect stress response were HR and weight, and 4) the 6-day H/F protocol did not convincingly decrease the stress response in adult rats and may increase the stress response in female rats. Results may cast doubt on the effectiveness of short-term stress reduction protocols in adult rats.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:05:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:05:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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