2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159514
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Being in an Impossible Situation
Abstract:
Being in an Impossible Situation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Horton-Deutsch, Sara
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 430L, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:3129427100
Conflict consumes an enormous amount of time, energy, and money. While constructive conflict can promote growth and change, destructive conflict can fuel bad feelings, damage relationships and result in depression or aggression. The purpose of this study was to examine the processes involved in destructive conflicts or "impossible situations" and how such conflicts can be prevented or aborted. For the purpose of this study, impossible situations were defined as reoccurring patterns of particular problems, often with the same person involved, over time. This qualitative study used grounded theory to study the social process of being involved in an impossible situation. A theoretical sampling process was used to select 12 adult participants who identified themselves as experiencing an impossible situation within their work setting. Participants provided the majority of data through audio taped interviews. Data was analyzed using the method constant comparative analysis to systematically generated theory. Three core categories emerged from the data analyses that were clearly different yet stage related: recognizing the situation, hitting the wall, and letting go. Recognizing the situation involved a process of the participant applying their entire repertoire of ways of responding to the situation in order to work toward resolution with the other person. Hitting the wall was the point of physical and emotional exhaustion and was frequently accompanied by collateral damage as these situations began to flow over into participant's personal lives and to others within the work setting. The final stage ultimately resulted in letting go of the situation. However, this stage involved a serious of complex phases including giving up, self-reflection, moving on, and self-resolution. While this was a painful reality for many participants the process of eventually separating oneself from the situation enabled participants to accomplish personal change and growth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeing in an Impossible Situationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159514-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Being in an Impossible Situation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Horton-Deutsch, Sara</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 430L, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3129427100</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shortond@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Conflict consumes an enormous amount of time, energy, and money. While constructive conflict can promote growth and change, destructive conflict can fuel bad feelings, damage relationships and result in depression or aggression. The purpose of this study was to examine the processes involved in destructive conflicts or &quot;impossible situations&quot; and how such conflicts can be prevented or aborted. For the purpose of this study, impossible situations were defined as reoccurring patterns of particular problems, often with the same person involved, over time. This qualitative study used grounded theory to study the social process of being involved in an impossible situation. A theoretical sampling process was used to select 12 adult participants who identified themselves as experiencing an impossible situation within their work setting. Participants provided the majority of data through audio taped interviews. Data was analyzed using the method constant comparative analysis to systematically generated theory. Three core categories emerged from the data analyses that were clearly different yet stage related: recognizing the situation, hitting the wall, and letting go. Recognizing the situation involved a process of the participant applying their entire repertoire of ways of responding to the situation in order to work toward resolution with the other person. Hitting the wall was the point of physical and emotional exhaustion and was frequently accompanied by collateral damage as these situations began to flow over into participant's personal lives and to others within the work setting. The final stage ultimately resulted in letting go of the situation. However, this stage involved a serious of complex phases including giving up, self-reflection, moving on, and self-resolution. While this was a painful reality for many participants the process of eventually separating oneself from the situation enabled participants to accomplish personal change and growth.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:05:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:05:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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