2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159515
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community-Based Primary Mental Health Care for Depressed Low-Income Women
Abstract:
Community-Based Primary Mental Health Care for Depressed Low-Income Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Oakley, Linda, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608.263.5866
Guided by the Quality Health Outcomes (QHO) Model, this two-part study was designed to: (I) evaluate the level of self-reported depression among racially diverse low-income women with access to mental health care and, (II) explore the feasibility of providing socially acceptable outreach group meetings for low-income women who are depressed. The Part I depression survey sample (N=302) was mostly African American (83%), never married singles, in their early thirties. Most had completed high school (63.1%) and most had annual household incomes of less than $15,000 (70.6%). The Part-I sample was mildly depressed (mean BDI=15.7, SD=11.09). Anecdotal findings from the Part-I survey indicated that few participants knew primary mental health care was available at the local health and family Center and few participants had ever received treatment for depression but many participants asked if the Center offered a depression "program" for women. Part-II outreach group feasibility data were obtained with a new sample (N=26) of racially diverse low-income women living in the same community. Over 12 weeks, 55 participants attended 14 outreach group meetings. Most participants chose to attend more than one group meeting. Compared with the survey sample, the outreach group sample was slightly more depressed (mean BDI=20.5, SD=7.07) and younger (mean age=23.76 years). Half were employed FT/ PT (53.8%), half were African American (N=13), and all had a newborn or very young child at home. Study findings suggest that moderately depressed young mothers living in the target community might be willing to attend outreach group meetings. Research aims for the next phase of this research include using health-promoting self-care outcomes to test the dynamics of positive peer group validation with positive depression-coping education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity-Based Primary Mental Health Care for Depressed Low-Income Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159515-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community-Based Primary Mental Health Care for Depressed Low-Income Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Oakley, Linda, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608.263.5866</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ldoakley@facstaff.wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Guided by the Quality Health Outcomes (QHO) Model, this two-part study was designed to: (I) evaluate the level of self-reported depression among racially diverse low-income women with access to mental health care and, (II) explore the feasibility of providing socially acceptable outreach group meetings for low-income women who are depressed. The Part I depression survey sample (N=302) was mostly African American (83%), never married singles, in their early thirties. Most had completed high school (63.1%) and most had annual household incomes of less than $15,000 (70.6%). The Part-I sample was mildly depressed (mean BDI=15.7, SD=11.09). Anecdotal findings from the Part-I survey indicated that few participants knew primary mental health care was available at the local health and family Center and few participants had ever received treatment for depression but many participants asked if the Center offered a depression &quot;program&quot; for women. Part-II outreach group feasibility data were obtained with a new sample (N=26) of racially diverse low-income women living in the same community. Over 12 weeks, 55 participants attended 14 outreach group meetings. Most participants chose to attend more than one group meeting. Compared with the survey sample, the outreach group sample was slightly more depressed (mean BDI=20.5, SD=7.07) and younger (mean age=23.76 years). Half were employed FT/ PT (53.8%), half were African American (N=13), and all had a newborn or very young child at home. Study findings suggest that moderately depressed young mothers living in the target community might be willing to attend outreach group meetings. Research aims for the next phase of this research include using health-promoting self-care outcomes to test the dynamics of positive peer group validation with positive depression-coping education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:05:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:05:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.