2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159516
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Self-Esteem Fluctuation and Angry Affect
Abstract:
Patterns of Self-Esteem Fluctuation and Angry Affect
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Stein, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, Rm 2342, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.763.9716
Unstable self-esteem (SE) is widely recognized as an important symptom of several mental disorders and a powerful determinant of angry affect. Yet specific patterns of SE fluctuation that characterize unstable SE are unknown. Rosenberg (1986) postulated that SE can be considered unstable only when dramatic shifts from high to low SE are experienced, while others suggest that smaller fluctuations within the range of high (or low) SE may also cause distress and angry self-protective responses. In this study, an analysis of self-esteem fluctuation in two groups of women, normal young adults (n=32) and women with bulimia nervosa (BN) (n=53) was completed. SE was measured five times daily for five days using Experience Sampling methodology and Kernis' (1989) modified version of the Rosenberg Scale. The standard deviation (SD) computed across the multiple measures of SE was used as an overall indicator of instability and statistical process control chart analyses were used to characterize properties of the individual's distribution of SE scores and identify statistically out-of-control episodes. Results show that while women with BN had a mean instability score (SD) approximately double that found in the control group, they were less likely to experience extreme positive or negative out-of control episodes compared to controls. For all subjects, SD was a stronger predictor of angry mood compared to indicators of extreme positive and negative change. Results indicate that: 1) stable SE is marked by occasional "out-of-control" episodes of extreme positive and negative SE and 2) unstable SE, characterized by large but normally distributed changes, is associated with high levels of negative moods. Therefore, SE stabilization interventions should focus on experiences of small but frequent SE fluctuations rather than targeting elimination of more isolated but extreme episodes of SE change.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Self-Esteem Fluctuation and Angry Affecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159516-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Self-Esteem Fluctuation and Angry Affect</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stein, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, Rm 2342, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.763.9716</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kfarchau@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Unstable self-esteem (SE) is widely recognized as an important symptom of several mental disorders and a powerful determinant of angry affect. Yet specific patterns of SE fluctuation that characterize unstable SE are unknown. Rosenberg (1986) postulated that SE can be considered unstable only when dramatic shifts from high to low SE are experienced, while others suggest that smaller fluctuations within the range of high (or low) SE may also cause distress and angry self-protective responses. In this study, an analysis of self-esteem fluctuation in two groups of women, normal young adults (n=32) and women with bulimia nervosa (BN) (n=53) was completed. SE was measured five times daily for five days using Experience Sampling methodology and Kernis' (1989) modified version of the Rosenberg Scale. The standard deviation (SD) computed across the multiple measures of SE was used as an overall indicator of instability and statistical process control chart analyses were used to characterize properties of the individual's distribution of SE scores and identify statistically out-of-control episodes. Results show that while women with BN had a mean instability score (SD) approximately double that found in the control group, they were less likely to experience extreme positive or negative out-of control episodes compared to controls. For all subjects, SD was a stronger predictor of angry mood compared to indicators of extreme positive and negative change. Results indicate that: 1) stable SE is marked by occasional &quot;out-of-control&quot; episodes of extreme positive and negative SE and 2) unstable SE, characterized by large but normally distributed changes, is associated with high levels of negative moods. Therefore, SE stabilization interventions should focus on experiences of small but frequent SE fluctuations rather than targeting elimination of more isolated but extreme episodes of SE change.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:05:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:05:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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