2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159520
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in a Plwh/a in a Low Prevalence Area
Abstract:
Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in a Plwh/a in a Low Prevalence Area
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Leasure, Angela, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Oklahoma
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 26901, 1100 North Stonewall, Oklahoma City, OK, 73117, USA
Contact Telephone:405.271.2062
The purpose of this project was to: 1. Examine the influence of individual characteristics, provider-client characteristics, and systems barriers/facilitators on adherence to antiretroviral therapy; and, (2) To identify the frequency and extent to which confidentiality concerns threaten adherence. Nonadherence was defined as not taking drugs on the prescribed time schedule, missing a dose or taking an extra dose, and not following the meal instructions. Methods This descriptive study collected data using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Sample The population of interest is people or parents of children with HIV living in a low prevalence state who have been prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Twenty-five people with HIV/AIDS participated in this study. Results Barriers and facilitators were categorized according to (1) characteristics of the medication itself, (2) individual characteristics/strategies, (3) client provider interactions, and (4) system resources. Characteristics of the pills were size and coating; number of doses and number of pills; side effects; and, meal requirements/meal restrictions. Personal strategies included cueing, pill planning, reminders, keeping a small extra supply at home/work, support from others and symptom management. Personal barriers included forgetting, medication interferes with lifestyle, need to conceal medication from others, complexity of regimen, AIDS "not real" , beliefs about the medication, women's traditional caregiver role, and AIDS as a whole new language. Client-Provider facilitative interactions included information presented verbally and in writing; information about the impact of the drugs on the virus; and commitment to take the drug as prescribed. Systems facilitators and barriers included living in a Title II state, compassionate drug access renewal every month, Medicaid's three punches; Medicare, Medicaid, ADAP alphabet soup; and, available services as our best kept secret.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in a Plwh/a in a Low Prevalence Areaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159520-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in a Plwh/a in a Low Prevalence Area</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leasure, Angela, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Oklahoma</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 26901, 1100 North Stonewall, Oklahoma City, OK, 73117, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">405.271.2062</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">RENEE-LEASURE@UOKHSC.EDU</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this project was to: 1. Examine the influence of individual characteristics, provider-client characteristics, and systems barriers/facilitators on adherence to antiretroviral therapy; and, (2) To identify the frequency and extent to which confidentiality concerns threaten adherence. Nonadherence was defined as not taking drugs on the prescribed time schedule, missing a dose or taking an extra dose, and not following the meal instructions. Methods This descriptive study collected data using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Sample The population of interest is people or parents of children with HIV living in a low prevalence state who have been prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Twenty-five people with HIV/AIDS participated in this study. Results Barriers and facilitators were categorized according to (1) characteristics of the medication itself, (2) individual characteristics/strategies, (3) client provider interactions, and (4) system resources. Characteristics of the pills were size and coating; number of doses and number of pills; side effects; and, meal requirements/meal restrictions. Personal strategies included cueing, pill planning, reminders, keeping a small extra supply at home/work, support from others and symptom management. Personal barriers included forgetting, medication interferes with lifestyle, need to conceal medication from others, complexity of regimen, AIDS &quot;not real&quot; , beliefs about the medication, women's traditional caregiver role, and AIDS as a whole new language. Client-Provider facilitative interactions included information presented verbally and in writing; information about the impact of the drugs on the virus; and commitment to take the drug as prescribed. Systems facilitators and barriers included living in a Title II state, compassionate drug access renewal every month, Medicaid's three punches; Medicare, Medicaid, ADAP alphabet soup; and, available services as our best kept secret.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:05:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:05:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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