2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159521
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advanced Practice Nursing and Smoking Cessation
Abstract:
Advanced Practice Nursing and Smoking Cessation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Buchanan, Lynne
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402.559.6629
The purpose of this research is to test innovative methods in smoking cessation for clients in primary care. The clinical practice guideline for treating tobacco use and dependence from the U.S. Public Health Service (2000) states that individuals should be asked about tobacco use and offered support for quitting. The guideline states treatment should be individualized for specific populations and include certain elements for success. The theoretical framework is based on Lazarus and Folkman's work which states that individuals respond to stressors such as smoking cessation by interpreting the event as challenging or as something they cannot control. The activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activates the pituitary to secrete adrenocorticotropin hormone and stimulation of the adrenal gland to release cortisol. The fight flight response is initiated. Evidence demonstrates that chronic stimulation of this system can result in patterns of dysfunction including smoking relapse and/or depression. Pilot work is ongoing to understand mechanisms in order to develop specific interventions for helping individuals to quit smoking. Variables for the study include demographics, clinical & smoking history, social support, depression, anxiety, coping, smoking cessation & relapse rates, and satisfaction with care. The design is a two group time series with data collected at baseline, and 3, 6 and 12 months. The independent variable is an intervention delivered by advanced practice nurses which includes social support, practical problem solving and cognitive behavioral therapy. To date, 30 subjects have randomly entered into the 2 groups. Preliminary results demonstrate a 60% smoking cessation rate at 6 weeks post-quitting for subjects in the intervention group. Subjects will be followed for up to 1 year to evaluate smoking abstinence rates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvanced Practice Nursing and Smoking Cessationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159521-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Advanced Practice Nursing and Smoking Cessation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buchanan, Lynne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402.559.6629</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lbuchanan@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research is to test innovative methods in smoking cessation for clients in primary care. The clinical practice guideline for treating tobacco use and dependence from the U.S. Public Health Service (2000) states that individuals should be asked about tobacco use and offered support for quitting. The guideline states treatment should be individualized for specific populations and include certain elements for success. The theoretical framework is based on Lazarus and Folkman's work which states that individuals respond to stressors such as smoking cessation by interpreting the event as challenging or as something they cannot control. The activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activates the pituitary to secrete adrenocorticotropin hormone and stimulation of the adrenal gland to release cortisol. The fight flight response is initiated. Evidence demonstrates that chronic stimulation of this system can result in patterns of dysfunction including smoking relapse and/or depression. Pilot work is ongoing to understand mechanisms in order to develop specific interventions for helping individuals to quit smoking. Variables for the study include demographics, clinical &amp; smoking history, social support, depression, anxiety, coping, smoking cessation &amp; relapse rates, and satisfaction with care. The design is a two group time series with data collected at baseline, and 3, 6 and 12 months. The independent variable is an intervention delivered by advanced practice nurses which includes social support, practical problem solving and cognitive behavioral therapy. To date, 30 subjects have randomly entered into the 2 groups. Preliminary results demonstrate a 60% smoking cessation rate at 6 weeks post-quitting for subjects in the intervention group. Subjects will be followed for up to 1 year to evaluate smoking abstinence rates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:05:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:05:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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