Carotid Intima-Media Thickness for Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159522
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness for Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Diabetes
Abstract:
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness for Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Penckofer, Sue
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:Professor & Associate Dean
Contact Address:Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA
Contact Telephone:708.216.9303
Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in postmenopausal women (PMP). Women with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are six times more likely to have fatal and nonfatal heart disease than women without diabetes. Intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery is a reliable, noninvasive method to evaluate cardiovascular risk. This study assessed cardiovascular risk in 20P women with T2DM and 20P without T2DM. Only women without known heart disease were eligible to participate. Measures of IMT and self-reported health and demographic variables were compared between these two groups. Ultrasound B-mode imaging was used for the carotid measures. Three separate IMT measurements were taken in each common carotid artery (about 2 cm proximal to the flow divider), and averaged. We previously reported an inter- and intra-rater coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 6% (CV < 10% reported as acceptable). Mean IMT was 0.88mm for with T2DM compared to without T2DM (0.74mm, p=.001). A mean IMT of 0.75mm has been reported for women who are more than 5 years. There were no significant differences between groups on age, race, level of activity, or cholesterol. Women with T2DM, however, reported more hypertension (p=.004), greater body mass index (p=.026), and less estrogen use (p=.027). In addition, 10% of the women with T2DM had significant plaque which required surgical intervention. Our study suggests that IMT is a valid way to screen for cardiovascular risk, particularly in women at high risk for CHD. It may also be a feasible, noninvasive method for monitoring the effectiveness of nursing interventions (e.g., diet, and physical activity) in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCarotid Intima-Media Thickness for Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159522-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Carotid Intima-Media Thickness for Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Penckofer, Sue</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708.216.9303</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">spencko@luc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in postmenopausal women (PMP). Women with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are six times more likely to have fatal and nonfatal heart disease than women without diabetes. Intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery is a reliable, noninvasive method to evaluate cardiovascular risk. This study assessed cardiovascular risk in 20P women with T2DM and 20P without T2DM. Only women without known heart disease were eligible to participate. Measures of IMT and self-reported health and demographic variables were compared between these two groups. Ultrasound B-mode imaging was used for the carotid measures. Three separate IMT measurements were taken in each common carotid artery (about 2 cm proximal to the flow divider), and averaged. We previously reported an inter- and intra-rater coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 6% (CV &lt; 10% reported as acceptable). Mean IMT was 0.88mm for with T2DM compared to without T2DM (0.74mm, p=.001). A mean IMT of 0.75mm has been reported for women who are more than 5 years. There were no significant differences between groups on age, race, level of activity, or cholesterol. Women with T2DM, however, reported more hypertension (p=.004), greater body mass index (p=.026), and less estrogen use (p=.027). In addition, 10% of the women with T2DM had significant plaque which required surgical intervention. Our study suggests that IMT is a valid way to screen for cardiovascular risk, particularly in women at high risk for CHD. It may also be a feasible, noninvasive method for monitoring the effectiveness of nursing interventions (e.g., diet, and physical activity) in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:05:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:05:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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