2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159525
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Elders with Dementia and Their Grandchildren
Abstract:
Elders with Dementia and Their Grandchildren
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Rempusheski, Veronica, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913.588.4535
The stigma, unknowns, and fear of dementia often create complex situations in giving care to elders, including intergenerational family obstacles and conflicts. No one has ever asked grandchildren how they are dealing with the situation. Unknown is how grandparents (GPs) and grandchildren (GC) relate to each other when a GP begins to experience memory problems and moves to a long-term care (LTC) facility. This study focuses on the GP-GC relationship, in order to uncover ways the first and third generations of a family deal with dementia, long-term care, and family conflicts. The purpose of this ethnographic study is to explore the nature and meaning of the relationship between elders with dementia who reside in LTC facilities and their grandchildren. The concepts of grandparenting, intergenerational relationships, aging, and health guide this exploration. Participants are elders with early stage dementia, residing in assisted care facilities, age 70+ y/o, with MMSE scores of 8-21/30, and their grandchildren, age 8-30 y/o. Each participant is interviewed at least once and observed during visits and activities at the facility. To-date, 8 GPs (1 M, 7 F, age 79-87) and 9 GC (2 M, 7 F, age 10-25) have been interviewed and observed. Transcribed interviews and logged observations are subjected to content, domain and taxonomic analyses (Spradley, 1979, 1980). Data inform subsequent participant selection and interview guide refinement to gain depth and clarity of emerging domains. Data collection will end when no additional domains emerge. Healthcare professionals in LTC are confronted with family relationship issues, some which impede individual and family health. Study results are expected to lend support to future studies aimed at enhancing the well being of cognitively impaired elders, and influencing healthy intergenerational family interactions and positive perceptions by younger generations about aging and elders with dementia.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleElders with Dementia and Their Grandchildrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159525-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Elders with Dementia and Their Grandchildren</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rempusheski, Veronica, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913.588.4535</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vrempusheski@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The stigma, unknowns, and fear of dementia often create complex situations in giving care to elders, including intergenerational family obstacles and conflicts. No one has ever asked grandchildren how they are dealing with the situation. Unknown is how grandparents (GPs) and grandchildren (GC) relate to each other when a GP begins to experience memory problems and moves to a long-term care (LTC) facility. This study focuses on the GP-GC relationship, in order to uncover ways the first and third generations of a family deal with dementia, long-term care, and family conflicts. The purpose of this ethnographic study is to explore the nature and meaning of the relationship between elders with dementia who reside in LTC facilities and their grandchildren. The concepts of grandparenting, intergenerational relationships, aging, and health guide this exploration. Participants are elders with early stage dementia, residing in assisted care facilities, age 70+ y/o, with MMSE scores of 8-21/30, and their grandchildren, age 8-30 y/o. Each participant is interviewed at least once and observed during visits and activities at the facility. To-date, 8 GPs (1 M, 7 F, age 79-87) and 9 GC (2 M, 7 F, age 10-25) have been interviewed and observed. Transcribed interviews and logged observations are subjected to content, domain and taxonomic analyses (Spradley, 1979, 1980). Data inform subsequent participant selection and interview guide refinement to gain depth and clarity of emerging domains. Data collection will end when no additional domains emerge. Healthcare professionals in LTC are confronted with family relationship issues, some which impede individual and family health. Study results are expected to lend support to future studies aimed at enhancing the well being of cognitively impaired elders, and influencing healthy intergenerational family interactions and positive perceptions by younger generations about aging and elders with dementia.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:05:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:05:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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