How Do Primary Care Providers Recognize Depression?: a Study of Contextual Conditions That Influence Primary Care Providers' Recognition of Depression

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159527
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Do Primary Care Providers Recognize Depression?: a Study of Contextual Conditions That Influence Primary Care Providers' Recognition of Depression
Abstract:
How Do Primary Care Providers Recognize Depression?: a Study of Contextual Conditions That Influence Primary Care Providers' Recognition of Depression
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Baik, Seong-Yi
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 265 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513.558.5219
The purpose of this study was to qualitatively investigate interactional processes by which primary care providers (PCPs) come to recognize depression and the contextual conditions that may influence that process. Grounded theory strategies were used to deepen our understanding of the recognition of depression from the perspective of the PCP. Thirteen unstructured and semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight PCPs (5 MDs and 3 NPs) and, for comparative analysis purposes, five mental health specialists (2 Psychiatrists and 3 APNPs). Each interview, an average of 45 minutes each, was audio taped and transcribed. Initially, interview questions were deliberately broad and open, and later became more directed based on the ongoing analysis. Grounded theory constant comparative analysis and dimensional analysis methods were used to analyze the data. By comparing the PCP and mental health interview data, the analysis revealed two processes by which primary care providers can come to recognize depression: "sorting out," (by either "ruling out" or "opening the door,") and "recognizing the person." This analysis also identified familiarity, experience, and time as contextual conditions that can influence PCPs' recognition of depression. Moreover, familiarity and experience appeared to be conditions that can make a relatively short primary care visit sufficient time for PCPs to recognize depression; therefore, critical subdimensions of familiarity and experience were explored. The findings of this study indicate that, for PCPs, the recognition of depression involves more than merely recognizing symptoms of depression. The contextual conditions under which the PCP and the patient interact can infuse significant complexity into the process by which PCPs come to recognize depression. These findings suggest that the contextual conditions under which the provider and the patient interact can offer an alternative theoretical framework for understanding PCP performance outcomes in recognizing depression in primary care settings. Implications for health care policies are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Do Primary Care Providers Recognize Depression?: a Study of Contextual Conditions That Influence Primary Care Providers' Recognition of Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159527-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Do Primary Care Providers Recognize Depression?: a Study of Contextual Conditions That Influence Primary Care Providers' Recognition of Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baik, Seong-Yi</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 265 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513.558.5219</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">seongyi.baik@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to qualitatively investigate interactional processes by which primary care providers (PCPs) come to recognize depression and the contextual conditions that may influence that process. Grounded theory strategies were used to deepen our understanding of the recognition of depression from the perspective of the PCP. Thirteen unstructured and semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight PCPs (5 MDs and 3 NPs) and, for comparative analysis purposes, five mental health specialists (2 Psychiatrists and 3 APNPs). Each interview, an average of 45 minutes each, was audio taped and transcribed. Initially, interview questions were deliberately broad and open, and later became more directed based on the ongoing analysis. Grounded theory constant comparative analysis and dimensional analysis methods were used to analyze the data. By comparing the PCP and mental health interview data, the analysis revealed two processes by which primary care providers can come to recognize depression: &quot;sorting out,&quot; (by either &quot;ruling out&quot; or &quot;opening the door,&quot;) and &quot;recognizing the person.&quot; This analysis also identified familiarity, experience, and time as contextual conditions that can influence PCPs' recognition of depression. Moreover, familiarity and experience appeared to be conditions that can make a relatively short primary care visit sufficient time for PCPs to recognize depression; therefore, critical subdimensions of familiarity and experience were explored. The findings of this study indicate that, for PCPs, the recognition of depression involves more than merely recognizing symptoms of depression. The contextual conditions under which the PCP and the patient interact can infuse significant complexity into the process by which PCPs come to recognize depression. These findings suggest that the contextual conditions under which the provider and the patient interact can offer an alternative theoretical framework for understanding PCP performance outcomes in recognizing depression in primary care settings. Implications for health care policies are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:05:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:05:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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