2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159537
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychotherapeutic Treatment Outcomes in Grandparent-Raised Children
Abstract:
Psychotherapeutic Treatment Outcomes in Grandparent-Raised Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Leder, Sharon
P.I. Institution Name:Grand Valley State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Kirkhof School of Nursing, One Campus Drive, 366C DeVos Center, Allendale, MI, 49401, USA
Contact Telephone:616.331.7176
One of the emerging trends in American families is the increasing number of children who are being raised by grandparents. A number of studies have addressed the stressors associated with caregiving and the presumed effects of those stressors on grandparents' health status. However, few researchers have examined the effects of this living situation on the grandchildren. In this study, the investigators focused specifically on grandparent-raised children who were in treatment for emotional and behavioral problems. The purposes of the study were to (a) describe the stressors and resources of grandparent-grandchild families and the therapeutic progress of the grandchildren, and (b) ascertain whether stressors, resources, and selected demographic variables were related to grandchild treatment outcomes. Data for this descriptive, correlational study were obtained from the closed records of 207 children, ages 3-18 years. The children received treatment at a child guidance clinic from 1987-1999 and were being raised by their grandparents. An investigator-constructed tool was used to obtain demographic, stressor, and resource data from the records. Treatment outcomes at the clinic were measured with the Progress Evaluation Scales (PES). The major findings of the study included: (a) the younger the child, the better the outcomes of treatment, (b) children who lived with two grandparent figures had greater improvement on the PES than children who lived with one grandparent, (c) children who had regular or no contact with their fathers made more progress on the PES than those who had irregular contact. There was limited documentation in the clinical records regarding the grandparents and the families' stressors and support systems. More thorough documented assessments of these reconfigured families will enhance clinical records as sources of research data.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychotherapeutic Treatment Outcomes in Grandparent-Raised Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159537-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychotherapeutic Treatment Outcomes in Grandparent-Raised Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leder, Sharon</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Grand Valley State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Kirkhof School of Nursing, One Campus Drive, 366C DeVos Center, Allendale, MI, 49401, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">616.331.7176</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leders@gvsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">One of the emerging trends in American families is the increasing number of children who are being raised by grandparents. A number of studies have addressed the stressors associated with caregiving and the presumed effects of those stressors on grandparents' health status. However, few researchers have examined the effects of this living situation on the grandchildren. In this study, the investigators focused specifically on grandparent-raised children who were in treatment for emotional and behavioral problems. The purposes of the study were to (a) describe the stressors and resources of grandparent-grandchild families and the therapeutic progress of the grandchildren, and (b) ascertain whether stressors, resources, and selected demographic variables were related to grandchild treatment outcomes. Data for this descriptive, correlational study were obtained from the closed records of 207 children, ages 3-18 years. The children received treatment at a child guidance clinic from 1987-1999 and were being raised by their grandparents. An investigator-constructed tool was used to obtain demographic, stressor, and resource data from the records. Treatment outcomes at the clinic were measured with the Progress Evaluation Scales (PES). The major findings of the study included: (a) the younger the child, the better the outcomes of treatment, (b) children who lived with two grandparent figures had greater improvement on the PES than children who lived with one grandparent, (c) children who had regular or no contact with their fathers made more progress on the PES than those who had irregular contact. There was limited documentation in the clinical records regarding the grandparents and the families' stressors and support systems. More thorough documented assessments of these reconfigured families will enhance clinical records as sources of research data.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:06:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:06:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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