Rates and Patterns of Restraint on Four Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Units

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159538
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rates and Patterns of Restraint on Four Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Units
Abstract:
Rates and Patterns of Restraint on Four Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Units
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Delaney, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA
Little is known about the patterns and rates of restraint use with children and adolescents hospitalized on short-term psychiatric units. Existing data is 10 years old when a child/adolescent's mean Length of Stay (LOS) was 3 to 6 months and there was scant use of psychotropic medication. Decreasing LOS and increasing use of medication has so dramatically changed inpatient child/adolescent treatment that the findings of early restraint studies may no longer apply. Yet such data are extremely useful in targeting restraint reduction efforts and identifying children at-risk for restraint. The three aims of this descriptive study were to examine the rate of restraint use on four short-term child and adolescent psychiatric units, to identify incident and setting variables that may be related to restraint use; and finally, to compare the characteristics of children and adolescents never restrained during hospitalization with a cohort of youngsters placed in restraint during their inpatient stay. To this end, a chart review was conducted on 100 records of children and adolescents admitted to four inpatient psychiatric units December, 1998 through December, 1999. During their hospitalization, 31 of these children were not restrained, 61 were restrained once or twice and nine were restrained more than twice. Data included select child characteristics, setting factors, and the events surrounding the restraint. Data analysis focused on the associations between the restraint incident and the child/setting/incident variables. Also examined were demographic and diagnostic characteristics of youngsters who were restrained versus those never placed in restraint. Preliminary analysis of the data indicates that children who were not restrained were more likely to be depressed, attend school in a regular classroom, and have a more moderate history of aggression. Restraint incidents usually occurred following a threat or aggressive acting out. Pending is analysis of the association between time/setting/variables and the restraint incident.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRates and Patterns of Restraint on Four Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Unitsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159538-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rates and Patterns of Restraint on Four Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Units</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Delaney, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Little is known about the patterns and rates of restraint use with children and adolescents hospitalized on short-term psychiatric units. Existing data is 10 years old when a child/adolescent's mean Length of Stay (LOS) was 3 to 6 months and there was scant use of psychotropic medication. Decreasing LOS and increasing use of medication has so dramatically changed inpatient child/adolescent treatment that the findings of early restraint studies may no longer apply. Yet such data are extremely useful in targeting restraint reduction efforts and identifying children at-risk for restraint. The three aims of this descriptive study were to examine the rate of restraint use on four short-term child and adolescent psychiatric units, to identify incident and setting variables that may be related to restraint use; and finally, to compare the characteristics of children and adolescents never restrained during hospitalization with a cohort of youngsters placed in restraint during their inpatient stay. To this end, a chart review was conducted on 100 records of children and adolescents admitted to four inpatient psychiatric units December, 1998 through December, 1999. During their hospitalization, 31 of these children were not restrained, 61 were restrained once or twice and nine were restrained more than twice. Data included select child characteristics, setting factors, and the events surrounding the restraint. Data analysis focused on the associations between the restraint incident and the child/setting/incident variables. Also examined were demographic and diagnostic characteristics of youngsters who were restrained versus those never placed in restraint. Preliminary analysis of the data indicates that children who were not restrained were more likely to be depressed, attend school in a regular classroom, and have a more moderate history of aggression. Restraint incidents usually occurred following a threat or aggressive acting out. Pending is analysis of the association between time/setting/variables and the restraint incident.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:06:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:06:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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