Self-Treatment of Pain in the Community: a Comparison of Urban, Suburban and Rural Cohorts

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159539
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Treatment of Pain in the Community: a Comparison of Urban, Suburban and Rural Cohorts
Abstract:
Self-Treatment of Pain in the Community: a Comparison of Urban, Suburban and Rural Cohorts
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Vallerand, April
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 364 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202., USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.0359
According to a National Gallup survey, 42% of adults in the United States report that they experience pain daily. The majority of the population frequently rely on self-treatment and/or self-medication of their pain. As the number of medications a patient takes increases, so does the likelihood of experiencing drug interactions that pose a potentially serious health threat to the patient. In addition, an increasing number of patients are seeking alternative therapies, often without informing their traditional health care practitioners. This presentation reports on a series of exploratory/descriptive studies designed to look at the occurrence of pain in persons in the community and to identify the modalities they use to treat pain. Potential interactions between pain self-treatment modalities and other medications being taken will also be explored. Factors that may affect self-treatment choices include income, ethnicity, educational level, and age. Data from 465 participants from urban and suburban locations in metropolitan Detroit will be presented in comparison with data from a previous study of 108 participants from a rural area of Michigan. The participants will be compared in terms of demographic data, and pain levels and interference by pain. In addition pain treatment choices will be compared for prescription medications, OTC medications, herbal supplements and non-pharmacological treatments. Data will indicate if individuals in varying geographical locations make different self-treatment choices. In addition, data will be explored to ascertain if availability of services, i.e. medical care, prescriptions services, alternative health care providers, health food stores, etc., influence self-treatment choices. Data will contribute to knowledge of current treatment choices regarding pain management and potentially harmful interactions. In addition, data will reveal the impact of pain self-treatment modalities on medications prescribed for other medical conditions. Comparative data will be used to develop intervention strategies that meet the needs of selective populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Treatment of Pain in the Community: a Comparison of Urban, Suburban and Rural Cohortsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159539-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Treatment of Pain in the Community: a Comparison of Urban, Suburban and Rural Cohorts</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vallerand, April</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 364 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202., USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.0359</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">april.vallerand@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">According to a National Gallup survey, 42% of adults in the United States report that they experience pain daily. The majority of the population frequently rely on self-treatment and/or self-medication of their pain. As the number of medications a patient takes increases, so does the likelihood of experiencing drug interactions that pose a potentially serious health threat to the patient. In addition, an increasing number of patients are seeking alternative therapies, often without informing their traditional health care practitioners. This presentation reports on a series of exploratory/descriptive studies designed to look at the occurrence of pain in persons in the community and to identify the modalities they use to treat pain. Potential interactions between pain self-treatment modalities and other medications being taken will also be explored. Factors that may affect self-treatment choices include income, ethnicity, educational level, and age. Data from 465 participants from urban and suburban locations in metropolitan Detroit will be presented in comparison with data from a previous study of 108 participants from a rural area of Michigan. The participants will be compared in terms of demographic data, and pain levels and interference by pain. In addition pain treatment choices will be compared for prescription medications, OTC medications, herbal supplements and non-pharmacological treatments. Data will indicate if individuals in varying geographical locations make different self-treatment choices. In addition, data will be explored to ascertain if availability of services, i.e. medical care, prescriptions services, alternative health care providers, health food stores, etc., influence self-treatment choices. Data will contribute to knowledge of current treatment choices regarding pain management and potentially harmful interactions. In addition, data will reveal the impact of pain self-treatment modalities on medications prescribed for other medical conditions. Comparative data will be used to develop intervention strategies that meet the needs of selective populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:06:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:06:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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