2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159543
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding Nutritional Health in Older Adults: a Pilot Study
Abstract:
Understanding Nutritional Health in Older Adults: a Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Callen, Bonnie
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
PURPOSE: Assessment of nutritional risk among older adults can direct interventions based on specific risk factors or areas of need. However interventions are only effective when the individual recognizes himself or herself as at risk. A pilot study of adults aged 65 and older admitted to an acute care setting was conducted. The purpose of this pilot was 1) to compare nutritional risk as measured by hospital dieticians on admission with two Nutrition Screening Initiative (NSI) tools, the DETERMINE Your Nutritional Health Checklist and the Level I Screen, and 2) to elicit from patients their perceptions of their nutritional health. METHOD: A cross sectional convenience sample in an academic health center was used for this descriptive study. RESULTS: Ten community-living patients (age range 68-86) were interviewed during their hospital stay. All ten were at nutritional risk as measured by hospital dietician assessment and both NSI screening tools. 40% were at moderate nutritional risk and 60% were at high nutritional risk. Additionally, none of the subjects ate the minimum amounts recommended by the food pyramid. Yet none of these patients believed themselves to be at risk and all perceived themselves as doing well nutritionally. All but one of these subjects had a BMI greater than 27 putting them in the overweight category according to the NSI categories. CONCLUSION: Patient, and health care professional perceptions of nutritional risk, may differ. One conclusion of this pilot is that interventions and education need to include the perceptions of targeted individuals in order to be successful.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding Nutritional Health in Older Adults: a Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159543-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding Nutritional Health in Older Adults: a Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Callen, Bonnie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">blcallen@students.wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: Assessment of nutritional risk among older adults can direct interventions based on specific risk factors or areas of need. However interventions are only effective when the individual recognizes himself or herself as at risk. A pilot study of adults aged 65 and older admitted to an acute care setting was conducted. The purpose of this pilot was 1) to compare nutritional risk as measured by hospital dieticians on admission with two Nutrition Screening Initiative (NSI) tools, the DETERMINE Your Nutritional Health Checklist and the Level I Screen, and 2) to elicit from patients their perceptions of their nutritional health. METHOD: A cross sectional convenience sample in an academic health center was used for this descriptive study. RESULTS: Ten community-living patients (age range 68-86) were interviewed during their hospital stay. All ten were at nutritional risk as measured by hospital dietician assessment and both NSI screening tools. 40% were at moderate nutritional risk and 60% were at high nutritional risk. Additionally, none of the subjects ate the minimum amounts recommended by the food pyramid. Yet none of these patients believed themselves to be at risk and all perceived themselves as doing well nutritionally. All but one of these subjects had a BMI greater than 27 putting them in the overweight category according to the NSI categories. CONCLUSION: Patient, and health care professional perceptions of nutritional risk, may differ. One conclusion of this pilot is that interventions and education need to include the perceptions of targeted individuals in order to be successful.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:06:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:06:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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