2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159544
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Descriptive Study of Individuals Successful at Long-Term Weight Management
Abstract:
A Descriptive Study of Individuals Successful at Long-Term Weight Management
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Tazelaar, Sally
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 112 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Currently 33% of Americans are overweight and being overweight is a serious health problem. The profound failure rate of dieting programs (95%) seems to indicate that diet program designers have not addressed the right combination of factors to allow people to achieve weight loss and continued long-term weight management. One way of increasing understanding of the factors required for successful long-term weight management is to study the people who have been successful at losing weight and keeping it off. The purpose of this study is to examine individuals successful at long-term weight management to identify and describe the significant variables of this population. The theory of individuals successful at long-term weight management is substructed from Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory. The successful individual is composed of three components; individual characteristics, confidence in abilities to management weight, and regulatory actions. Individual characteristics are those factors internal and external to individuals that directly affect their confidence in abilities and regulatory actions. Confidence in abilities is the complex acquired capability to meet an individual's continuing requirements for self-care that regulates life processes, maintains or promotes integrity of human structure and functioning and human development, and promotes well-being. Regulatory actions are the actions individuals successful at long-term weight management take every day to regulate their own functioning and development. Data collection is ongoing for this non-experimental, descriptive pilot study. Individuals who began a deliberate weight loss program, have lost at least 30 pounds at sometime in their life, have maintained the weight loss, and currently have a BMI less than 26 are being sought to complete a written survey. The correlations planned will establish the degree of relationship between the theory component variables and guide the researcher's continuing research to prove or disprove the theory of individuals successful at long-term weight management.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Descriptive Study of Individuals Successful at Long-Term Weight Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159544-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Descriptive Study of Individuals Successful at Long-Term Weight Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tazelaar, Sally</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 112 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">s.tazelaar@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Currently 33% of Americans are overweight and being overweight is a serious health problem. The profound failure rate of dieting programs (95%) seems to indicate that diet program designers have not addressed the right combination of factors to allow people to achieve weight loss and continued long-term weight management. One way of increasing understanding of the factors required for successful long-term weight management is to study the people who have been successful at losing weight and keeping it off. The purpose of this study is to examine individuals successful at long-term weight management to identify and describe the significant variables of this population. The theory of individuals successful at long-term weight management is substructed from Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory. The successful individual is composed of three components; individual characteristics, confidence in abilities to management weight, and regulatory actions. Individual characteristics are those factors internal and external to individuals that directly affect their confidence in abilities and regulatory actions. Confidence in abilities is the complex acquired capability to meet an individual's continuing requirements for self-care that regulates life processes, maintains or promotes integrity of human structure and functioning and human development, and promotes well-being. Regulatory actions are the actions individuals successful at long-term weight management take every day to regulate their own functioning and development. Data collection is ongoing for this non-experimental, descriptive pilot study. Individuals who began a deliberate weight loss program, have lost at least 30 pounds at sometime in their life, have maintained the weight loss, and currently have a BMI less than 26 are being sought to complete a written survey. The correlations planned will establish the degree of relationship between the theory component variables and guide the researcher's continuing research to prove or disprove the theory of individuals successful at long-term weight management.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:06:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:06:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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