2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159550
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of the Perceived Barriers to Healthy Eating Scale
Abstract:
Development of the Perceived Barriers to Healthy Eating Scale
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Fowles, Eileen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Adjunct Professor
Contact Address:Mennonite College of Nursing, Campus Box 5810, 312 Edwards Hall, Normal, IL, 61790, USA
Contact Telephone:309.438.2576
This project will examine construct validity, test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the Perceived Barriers to Healthy Eating Scale (BHES), which assesses obstacles to eating healthy foods. Barriers to participating in healthy behaviors identified by Pender (1996) guided item generation. According to the Health Promotion Model, real or imagined barriers influence intentions to engage in the behavior and may lead to behavior avoidance. Three items assessing perceptions of unavailability relate to lack of transportation and distance to grocery stores; three items assess the barrier of expense related to food costs; three items assess difficulty in engaging in the healthy eating related to cooking; three items assess inconvenience related to proper functioning of appliances; and six items assessing preferences for specific foods. The 18 items BHES is scored on a 5-point Likert scale. Pilot-testing of the BHES with 20 pregnant women revealed that the items were understandable. Test-retest reliability was .88. 180 women are needed to test the 18-item BHES (Munro, 1997); therefore, 250 subjects will be approached to compensate for sample mortality. Participants will complete a demographic questionnaire, the BHES, and the Health Promotion Lifestyle Scale-II (HPLP-II,) during an initial childbirth education class (time 1) and the BHES during another class two weeks later (time 2). Reliability will be assessed by correlating BHES scores at time 1 and time 2 (test-retest) and testing internal consistency. Construct validity will be assessed by correlating BHES and HPLP-II scores and conducting factor analysis. Pender (1987) suggest that an increase in barriers (higher scores on the BHES) will impede engagement in the health promoting activities (lower scores in the HPLP-II). The BHES may identify limitations to a woman's ability to eat nutritious meals and guide the program development to improve the dietary intake of pregnant women and subsequent birth outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of the Perceived Barriers to Healthy Eating Scaleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159550-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of the Perceived Barriers to Healthy Eating Scale</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fowles, Eileen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mennonite College of Nursing, Campus Box 5810, 312 Edwards Hall, Normal, IL, 61790, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309.438.2576</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">erfowle@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This project will examine construct validity, test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the Perceived Barriers to Healthy Eating Scale (BHES), which assesses obstacles to eating healthy foods. Barriers to participating in healthy behaviors identified by Pender (1996) guided item generation. According to the Health Promotion Model, real or imagined barriers influence intentions to engage in the behavior and may lead to behavior avoidance. Three items assessing perceptions of unavailability relate to lack of transportation and distance to grocery stores; three items assess the barrier of expense related to food costs; three items assess difficulty in engaging in the healthy eating related to cooking; three items assess inconvenience related to proper functioning of appliances; and six items assessing preferences for specific foods. The 18 items BHES is scored on a 5-point Likert scale. Pilot-testing of the BHES with 20 pregnant women revealed that the items were understandable. Test-retest reliability was .88. 180 women are needed to test the 18-item BHES (Munro, 1997); therefore, 250 subjects will be approached to compensate for sample mortality. Participants will complete a demographic questionnaire, the BHES, and the Health Promotion Lifestyle Scale-II (HPLP-II,) during an initial childbirth education class (time 1) and the BHES during another class two weeks later (time 2). Reliability will be assessed by correlating BHES scores at time 1 and time 2 (test-retest) and testing internal consistency. Construct validity will be assessed by correlating BHES and HPLP-II scores and conducting factor analysis. Pender (1987) suggest that an increase in barriers (higher scores on the BHES) will impede engagement in the health promoting activities (lower scores in the HPLP-II). The BHES may identify limitations to a woman's ability to eat nutritious meals and guide the program development to improve the dietary intake of pregnant women and subsequent birth outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:07:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:07:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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