Efficacy of Hand Massage for Enhancing Comfort and Related Outcomes for Patients near End of Life

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159552
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of Hand Massage for Enhancing Comfort and Related Outcomes for Patients near End of Life
Abstract:
Efficacy of Hand Massage for Enhancing Comfort and Related Outcomes for Patients near End of Life
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Kolcaba, Katharine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 201U, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.6974
Comfort is an important outcome in standards of care for hospice nursing. However, there is scant research on comfort measures beyond medication for pain management. This study conceptualizes comfort holistically, identifying four areas of comfort needs that are addressed. Those areas are (a) physical, (b) psychosocial, (c) environmental, and (d) sociocultural. Hand massage is a holistic intervention that addresses all of these comfort needs non-pharmacologically. Patients are recruited from two hospice agencies in NE Ohio. After attending weekly team conferences, researchers identify patients who have a Karnofsky score above 40, are cognitively oriented and alert, and are likely to remain so for at least three weeks. Those patients are contacted by the researchers who explain the study and make an appointment to see the patient at home or care center. After informed consent is obtained, patients are randomized into Treatment (T) or control (C) groups. Both groups answer questionnaires once a week for three weeks; the T group also receives 20 minutes total of hand massage on both forearms twice a week for three weeks. At the end of data collection the C group will receive the intervention and both groups will receive a brochure describing the massage, in the event that other caregivers want to administer it. Groups will be compared on demographic data, comfort, symptom distress using MANOVA. Later, if the patient dies, the primary nurse will be asked to rate the peacefulness of death and these scores will be correlated with aggregated comfort scores. Qualitative findings also will be utilized to triangulate the data.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of Hand Massage for Enhancing Comfort and Related Outcomes for Patients near End of Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159552-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Efficacy of Hand Massage for Enhancing Comfort and Related Outcomes for Patients near End of Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kolcaba, Katharine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 201U, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.6974</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kolcaba@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Comfort is an important outcome in standards of care for hospice nursing. However, there is scant research on comfort measures beyond medication for pain management. This study conceptualizes comfort holistically, identifying four areas of comfort needs that are addressed. Those areas are (a) physical, (b) psychosocial, (c) environmental, and (d) sociocultural. Hand massage is a holistic intervention that addresses all of these comfort needs non-pharmacologically. Patients are recruited from two hospice agencies in NE Ohio. After attending weekly team conferences, researchers identify patients who have a Karnofsky score above 40, are cognitively oriented and alert, and are likely to remain so for at least three weeks. Those patients are contacted by the researchers who explain the study and make an appointment to see the patient at home or care center. After informed consent is obtained, patients are randomized into Treatment (T) or control (C) groups. Both groups answer questionnaires once a week for three weeks; the T group also receives 20 minutes total of hand massage on both forearms twice a week for three weeks. At the end of data collection the C group will receive the intervention and both groups will receive a brochure describing the massage, in the event that other caregivers want to administer it. Groups will be compared on demographic data, comfort, symptom distress using MANOVA. Later, if the patient dies, the primary nurse will be asked to rate the peacefulness of death and these scores will be correlated with aggregated comfort scores. Qualitative findings also will be utilized to triangulate the data.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:07:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:07:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.