Infant Feeding Decision Trends among Adolescent Kansas City Area WIC Recipients: Implications of Social Support and Prenatal Breast-Feeding Education upon the Infant Feeding Decision

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159557
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Infant Feeding Decision Trends among Adolescent Kansas City Area WIC Recipients: Implications of Social Support and Prenatal Breast-Feeding Education upon the Infant Feeding Decision
Abstract:
Infant Feeding Decision Trends among Adolescent Kansas City Area WIC Recipients: Implications of Social Support and Prenatal Breast-Feeding Education upon the Infant Feeding Decision
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Fulk, Kendra
P.I. Institution Name:Research College
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 2316 East Meyer Boulevard, Kansas City, MO, 64132, USA
Purpose: This descriptive study examined the influence of social support and level of breast-feeding education on the perceptions of breast-feeding and decision to breast or bottle-feed. Theory: The study was based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Sample: The sample consisted of 30 adolescent mothers ages 15-19 participating in WIC. Method: The "Infant Feeding Method Questionnaire" (IFMQ), measuring negative and positive perceptions about breast-feeding, was administered. The instrument included questions about social support, education on breast-feeding, and feeding history of the infant. Results: This sample preferred bottle-feeding. There was a correlation between convenience and breast-feeding as healthy and good for the baby, and negative perceptions of breast-feeding [e.g. breast-feeding makes it hard to lose weight, makes your breasts sag, and makes you feel tired]. Race was significantly related to the infant feeding decision. Participants had received very little education on breast-feeding. Most expressed that breast-feeding was better and/or healthier for the infant, but chose to bottle-feed. Most agreed that the father of the baby wanted them to breast-feed. Convenience, the ability of others to help care for the infant and cosmetic concerns related to breast-feeding were identified as influencing the decision to bottle-feed. The level of convenience was primary reason for the method that was chosen. Those who had chosen breast-feeding initially and then changed to bottle-feeding gave discouragement and dissatisfaction as the reason. However, the study showed there was a lack of social support and breast-feeding education for these participants. Conclusion: It is recommended that health professionals use every opportunity to educate the family and adolescent mother about the benefits of breast-feeding to positively influence perceptions concerning breast-feeding and its duration.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfant Feeding Decision Trends among Adolescent Kansas City Area WIC Recipients: Implications of Social Support and Prenatal Breast-Feeding Education upon the Infant Feeding Decisionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159557-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Infant Feeding Decision Trends among Adolescent Kansas City Area WIC Recipients: Implications of Social Support and Prenatal Breast-Feeding Education upon the Infant Feeding Decision</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fulk, Kendra</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Research College</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 2316 East Meyer Boulevard, Kansas City, MO, 64132, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This descriptive study examined the influence of social support and level of breast-feeding education on the perceptions of breast-feeding and decision to breast or bottle-feed. Theory: The study was based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Sample: The sample consisted of 30 adolescent mothers ages 15-19 participating in WIC. Method: The &quot;Infant Feeding Method Questionnaire&quot; (IFMQ), measuring negative and positive perceptions about breast-feeding, was administered. The instrument included questions about social support, education on breast-feeding, and feeding history of the infant. Results: This sample preferred bottle-feeding. There was a correlation between convenience and breast-feeding as healthy and good for the baby, and negative perceptions of breast-feeding [e.g. breast-feeding makes it hard to lose weight, makes your breasts sag, and makes you feel tired]. Race was significantly related to the infant feeding decision. Participants had received very little education on breast-feeding. Most expressed that breast-feeding was better and/or healthier for the infant, but chose to bottle-feed. Most agreed that the father of the baby wanted them to breast-feed. Convenience, the ability of others to help care for the infant and cosmetic concerns related to breast-feeding were identified as influencing the decision to bottle-feed. The level of convenience was primary reason for the method that was chosen. Those who had chosen breast-feeding initially and then changed to bottle-feeding gave discouragement and dissatisfaction as the reason. However, the study showed there was a lack of social support and breast-feeding education for these participants. Conclusion: It is recommended that health professionals use every opportunity to educate the family and adolescent mother about the benefits of breast-feeding to positively influence perceptions concerning breast-feeding and its duration.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:07:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:07:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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