2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159561
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Women's Attitudes and Knowledge about Alcohol
Abstract:
Preventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Women's Attitudes and Knowledge about Alcohol
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Walker, Deborah, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 3320 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.763.3710
Study Purpose: The incidence of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is increasing yet it is 100% preventable. The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about health behaviors related to alcohol consumption of women requesting EC and pregnancy tests. Methodology: Participants were women requesting a pregnancy test and/or emergency contraception at two outpatient clinics in Ann Arbor, MI. Women who agreed to participate completed pretests about health behavior, knowledge and attitudes about alcohol, read an educational pamphlet about FAS and completed the knowledge posttest. Statistical analyses were performed appropriate to the specific variable and research question. Data were collected from 4/00-10/00. Results Fifty women participated in the study. The women were predominantly young (x=23.8 y.o.), single (n=39, 78%) and with some college education (n=46, 94%). Over half of the sample (n=26) reported drinking beer at least once a week, and drank 1-6 cans on each occasion. Seventy-nine percent of the participants received ECP at the clinic visit. Younger women expressed a more tolerant attitude about alcohol (p=0.20) and drank significantly more beer on occasion (p=.015). Women who reported drinking alcohol when they last had sex were significantly (p=.017) less tolerant in their attitude about alcohol. Finally, the educational intervention used in this study was effective in communicating knowledge about FAS to this population (p<.0001). Conclusions: These findings suggest that young women are engaging in behaviours that could put a fetus at risk for alcohol exposure. Thorough history taking to determine the woman's attitude about alcohol, especially with those at risk for an unplanned pregnancy or sex under the influence is vitally important. Clinicians are well advised to provide educational information about FAS and other alcohol related disorders when women are seeking ECP or pregnancy tests.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Women's Attitudes and Knowledge about Alcoholen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159561-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Women's Attitudes and Knowledge about Alcohol</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walker, Deborah, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 3320 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.763.3710</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dswalker@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Study Purpose: The incidence of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is increasing yet it is 100% preventable. The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about health behaviors related to alcohol consumption of women requesting EC and pregnancy tests. Methodology: Participants were women requesting a pregnancy test and/or emergency contraception at two outpatient clinics in Ann Arbor, MI. Women who agreed to participate completed pretests about health behavior, knowledge and attitudes about alcohol, read an educational pamphlet about FAS and completed the knowledge posttest. Statistical analyses were performed appropriate to the specific variable and research question. Data were collected from 4/00-10/00. Results Fifty women participated in the study. The women were predominantly young (x=23.8 y.o.), single (n=39, 78%) and with some college education (n=46, 94%). Over half of the sample (n=26) reported drinking beer at least once a week, and drank 1-6 cans on each occasion. Seventy-nine percent of the participants received ECP at the clinic visit. Younger women expressed a more tolerant attitude about alcohol (p=0.20) and drank significantly more beer on occasion (p=.015). Women who reported drinking alcohol when they last had sex were significantly (p=.017) less tolerant in their attitude about alcohol. Finally, the educational intervention used in this study was effective in communicating knowledge about FAS to this population (p&lt;.0001). Conclusions: These findings suggest that young women are engaging in behaviours that could put a fetus at risk for alcohol exposure. Thorough history taking to determine the woman's attitude about alcohol, especially with those at risk for an unplanned pregnancy or sex under the influence is vitally important. Clinicians are well advised to provide educational information about FAS and other alcohol related disorders when women are seeking ECP or pregnancy tests.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:07:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:07:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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