The Relationship between Height Change, Osteoporosis Risk Factors, and Bone Mineral Density

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159567
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship between Height Change, Osteoporosis Risk Factors, and Bone Mineral Density
Abstract:
The Relationship between Height Change, Osteoporosis Risk Factors, and Bone Mineral Density
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Allds, Marleen
Contact Address:1310 Willow Drive,, Ashtabula, OH, 44004, USA
Co-Authors:Carol A Sedlak; Peggy Doheny
Osteoporosis is recognized as an important public health concern. Examining the change in a person’s height has been suggested as a method of screening for osteoporosis (Hunt, 1996). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between height change, osteoporosis risk factors (calcium intake, weight bearing exercise, smoking, alcohol use) and bone mineral density, by performing a replication study on secondary data collected on 168 healthy women, ages 50 to 65, who had a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) screening of the hip and spine to determine bone density. The physiological model of bone growth was used as the theoretical framework for this study. Regression and ANOVA were used for data analysis. No significant relationships were found between height change, osteoporosis risk factors, and bone mineral density. The mean height change for these women was -.19 inches. In contrast to Hunt’s (1996) research on height change for osteoporosis screening, this study had younger, healthier subjects that did not manifest significant height loss. Twenty-two women (13%) had osteoporosis, 72 (43%) had osteopenia, 71 (42%) had normal bone density, and three had no report of the spine but normal bone density in the hip. The average daily calcium intake was 625 mg and the average time spent performing daily weight bearing exercise was 10 minutes. More than 85% of women did not smoke and over half (53%) did not consume alcohol. Results suggest that height loss measurement is not an effective screening tool for osteoporosis in healthy women. Although 56% of these women had abnormal bone density, height change from osteoporosis has not yet occurred. The good news is that women, ages 50 to 65, still have time to engage in osteoporosis preventing behaviors to prevent bone loss. Results of this study have implications for nurses conducting osteoporosis risk assessments. AN: MN030047
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship between Height Change, Osteoporosis Risk Factors, and Bone Mineral Densityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159567-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship between Height Change, Osteoporosis Risk Factors, and Bone Mineral Density </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Allds, Marleen</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1310 Willow Drive,, Ashtabula, OH, 44004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol A Sedlak; Peggy Doheny</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Osteoporosis is recognized as an important public health concern. Examining the change in a person&rsquo;s height has been suggested as a method of screening for osteoporosis (Hunt, 1996). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between height change, osteoporosis risk factors (calcium intake, weight bearing exercise, smoking, alcohol use) and bone mineral density, by performing a replication study on secondary data collected on 168 healthy women, ages 50 to 65, who had a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) screening of the hip and spine to determine bone density. The physiological model of bone growth was used as the theoretical framework for this study. Regression and ANOVA were used for data analysis. No significant relationships were found between height change, osteoporosis risk factors, and bone mineral density. The mean height change for these women was -.19 inches. In contrast to Hunt&rsquo;s (1996) research on height change for osteoporosis screening, this study had younger, healthier subjects that did not manifest significant height loss. Twenty-two women (13%) had osteoporosis, 72 (43%) had osteopenia, 71 (42%) had normal bone density, and three had no report of the spine but normal bone density in the hip. The average daily calcium intake was 625 mg and the average time spent performing daily weight bearing exercise was 10 minutes. More than 85% of women did not smoke and over half (53%) did not consume alcohol. Results suggest that height loss measurement is not an effective screening tool for osteoporosis in healthy women. Although 56% of these women had abnormal bone density, height change from osteoporosis has not yet occurred. The good news is that women, ages 50 to 65, still have time to engage in osteoporosis preventing behaviors to prevent bone loss. Results of this study have implications for nurses conducting osteoporosis risk assessments. AN: MN030047 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:08:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:08:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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