2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159568
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Unplanned hospital readmission from a Transitional Care Unit
Abstract:
Unplanned hospital readmission from a Transitional Care Unit
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Anderson, Mary
Contact Address:Quad Cities Regional Program, 2368 - Fifth Street, East Moline, IL, 61244, USA
Co-Authors:Kathleen S. Hanson; Lelia B. Helms
Elderly patients are often admitted to a Transitional Care Unit (TCU) for integrated rehabilitation services following an episode of hospitalization. Patient care in a TCU stabilizes the patient, promotes recovery, and purportedly lowers the risk for unplanned, costly, hospital readmissions. However, there are few studies of patient outcomes following transitional care, particularly unplanned hospital readmission. Using a retrospective descriptive approach, profiles were developed of transitional care unit (TCU) patients who were readmitted to the hospital. The TCU was housed in a small rural midwestern hospital. Medical records of all Medicare patients readmitted to the hospital during a TCU stay between August 1, 1998 and July 31, 2000 were audited, resulting in a sample of 68. Using an adapted version of the Hospital Readmission Inventory (HRI), data were collected concerning demographics, readmission history, medical status indicators, functional status indicators, and circumstances surrounding readmission. Readmitted patients were likely to be female, widowed, and to have lived at home without home health care (HHC) services prior to the original hospital admission. Most had supplementary private insurance, a medical power of attorney (POA), and a living will. Patients were generally readmitted within seven days for a newly developed problem such as circulatory, digestive, or respiratory disorders. Fifty percent had seven co-morbid diagnoses and received more than twelve different types of medications. The readmission was most often the result of the development or worsening of neurological symptoms; and medication changes were the most frequently documented new physician orders prior to readmission. The majority of patients did not return home after hospital readmission. Better comprehension of the characteristics of such TCU patients will assist health care providers to plan and implement timely and effective interventions, and assist facility personnel in fiscal and resource management issues. AN: MN030366
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnplanned hospital readmission from a Transitional Care Uniten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159568-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Unplanned hospital readmission from a Transitional Care Unit</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Quad Cities Regional Program, 2368 - Fifth Street, East Moline, IL, 61244, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen S. Hanson; Lelia B. Helms</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Elderly patients are often admitted to a Transitional Care Unit (TCU) for integrated rehabilitation services following an episode of hospitalization. Patient care in a TCU stabilizes the patient, promotes recovery, and purportedly lowers the risk for unplanned, costly, hospital readmissions. However, there are few studies of patient outcomes following transitional care, particularly unplanned hospital readmission. Using a retrospective descriptive approach, profiles were developed of transitional care unit (TCU) patients who were readmitted to the hospital. The TCU was housed in a small rural midwestern hospital. Medical records of all Medicare patients readmitted to the hospital during a TCU stay between August 1, 1998 and July 31, 2000 were audited, resulting in a sample of 68. Using an adapted version of the Hospital Readmission Inventory (HRI), data were collected concerning demographics, readmission history, medical status indicators, functional status indicators, and circumstances surrounding readmission. Readmitted patients were likely to be female, widowed, and to have lived at home without home health care (HHC) services prior to the original hospital admission. Most had supplementary private insurance, a medical power of attorney (POA), and a living will. Patients were generally readmitted within seven days for a newly developed problem such as circulatory, digestive, or respiratory disorders. Fifty percent had seven co-morbid diagnoses and received more than twelve different types of medications. The readmission was most often the result of the development or worsening of neurological symptoms; and medication changes were the most frequently documented new physician orders prior to readmission. The majority of patients did not return home after hospital readmission. Better comprehension of the characteristics of such TCU patients will assist health care providers to plan and implement timely and effective interventions, and assist facility personnel in fiscal and resource management issues. AN: MN030366 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:08:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:08:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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