2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159569
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Prospective Study of Emergency Nurses' Triage Decisions
Abstract:
A Prospective Study of Emergency Nurses' Triage Decisions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia
Contact Address:SON, 400 N. Ingalls, Room 2179, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Women who suffer a myocardial infarction (MI) are less likely than men to be diagnosed based on their presenting symptoms, to receive aggressive treatment and to survive an acute cardiac event. Few studies have examined the decision-making processes of emergency nurses, even though nurses triage decisions often determine initial patient priority and urgency status for emergency evaluation and treatment. Purpose: To prospectively examine nurses’ triage decisions for individuals with complaints suggestive of MI and the relationship to patient outcomes. Four research questions examine: (1) the clinical cues nurses use to make inferences about MI, (2) the clinical cues nurse use to cognitively represent a suspected MI, (3) if different cognitive representations of MI result in different levels of triage urgency and (4) if nurses’ inferences predict patient admission location, diagnosis, or mortality. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The theoretical framework is a synthesis of Hammond’s lens model (1964) and Evans’ (1984) two-stage reasoning process. Subjects: Emergency department registered nurses who triage patients for complaints suggestive of MI. A total of 108 triage decisions will be examined. Method: A prospective, descriptive design is used to examine nurses’ initial inferences and triage decisions for individuals with complaints emanating from their chest, jaw, neck, back, abdomen or arms. Initial inferences are recorded. Visual analog scales are used to measure the likelihood the patient signs and symptoms represent cardiac, respiratory, gastrointestinal, or other problems, to measure urgency status and evaluation confidence. Lastly, objective clinical data are collected from review of medical records for laboratory, diagnostic results, admission destination, and patient outcome. Results/Conclusions: Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses will be conducted Data analysis, findings, and implications will be completed by December 2002. AN: MN030065
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Prospective Study of Emergency Nurses' Triage Decisionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159569-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Prospective Study of Emergency Nurses' Triage Decisions </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 400 N. Ingalls, Room 2179, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Women who suffer a myocardial infarction (MI) are less likely than men to be diagnosed based on their presenting symptoms, to receive aggressive treatment and to survive an acute cardiac event. Few studies have examined the decision-making processes of emergency nurses, even though nurses triage decisions often determine initial patient priority and urgency status for emergency evaluation and treatment. Purpose: To prospectively examine nurses&rsquo; triage decisions for individuals with complaints suggestive of MI and the relationship to patient outcomes. Four research questions examine: (1) the clinical cues nurses use to make inferences about MI, (2) the clinical cues nurse use to cognitively represent a suspected MI, (3) if different cognitive representations of MI result in different levels of triage urgency and (4) if nurses&rsquo; inferences predict patient admission location, diagnosis, or mortality. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The theoretical framework is a synthesis of Hammond&rsquo;s lens model (1964) and Evans&rsquo; (1984) two-stage reasoning process. Subjects: Emergency department registered nurses who triage patients for complaints suggestive of MI. A total of 108 triage decisions will be examined. Method: A prospective, descriptive design is used to examine nurses&rsquo; initial inferences and triage decisions for individuals with complaints emanating from their chest, jaw, neck, back, abdomen or arms. Initial inferences are recorded. Visual analog scales are used to measure the likelihood the patient signs and symptoms represent cardiac, respiratory, gastrointestinal, or other problems, to measure urgency status and evaluation confidence. Lastly, objective clinical data are collected from review of medical records for laboratory, diagnostic results, admission destination, and patient outcome. Results/Conclusions: Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses will be conducted Data analysis, findings, and implications will be completed by December 2002. AN: MN030065 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:08:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:08:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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