Salivary Cortisol Response in Survivors of Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159572
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Salivary Cortisol Response in Survivors of Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury
Abstract:
Salivary Cortisol Response in Survivors of Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Bay, Esther
Contact Address:2106 Kratage Ct, Commerce, MI, 48382, USA
Theorists claim that stress-related disorders are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Animal and human experiments linking chronic stress and depression suggest that sustained stress resulting in elevated cortisol levels may be damaging to the brain. Furthermore, brain-injured animals exposed to chronic cortisol experienced more cognitive difficulties than controls and a lack diurnal variation of cortisol and hypercortisolemia was noted in survivors in acute rehabilitation. Should stress and hypercortisolemia be present after TBI, the survivor may be more likely to experience prolonged cognitive difficulties. This study examined the 12-hour profile of salivary cortisols in 75 persons who were between 1-24 months of a mild or moderate brain injury and had participated in a formal out-patient rehabilitation program. A non-probability sample was obtained at 5 treatment facilities in MI and the cortisol levels collected on a single day at 8am, noon, 1600 and 2000. Additionally, perceived chronic stress was determined with the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Childhood Adversity Checklist and Stressful Life Event Checklist. There was equal participation by males and females, yet only 75% participated in this portion of the study. Using paired t-tests, there was the usual pattern of higher morning cortisols and lower pm values. There were no age or gender differences for any timed value of cortisol level. There were no significant correlations between the major study variables of chronic stress and any of the timed cortisol levels, despite the presence of perceived chronic stress. There was a significant and positive correlation between the 0800 cortisol level and social support (r=.30, p=.03). These results suggest that salivary cortisol can be used to determine a biological measure of stress with a TBI sample and provides baseline data about the properties of cortisol after TBI. AN: MN030319
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSalivary Cortisol Response in Survivors of Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159572-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Salivary Cortisol Response in Survivors of Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bay, Esther</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2106 Kratage Ct, Commerce, MI, 48382, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Theorists claim that stress-related disorders are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Animal and human experiments linking chronic stress and depression suggest that sustained stress resulting in elevated cortisol levels may be damaging to the brain. Furthermore, brain-injured animals exposed to chronic cortisol experienced more cognitive difficulties than controls and a lack diurnal variation of cortisol and hypercortisolemia was noted in survivors in acute rehabilitation. Should stress and hypercortisolemia be present after TBI, the survivor may be more likely to experience prolonged cognitive difficulties. This study examined the 12-hour profile of salivary cortisols in 75 persons who were between 1-24 months of a mild or moderate brain injury and had participated in a formal out-patient rehabilitation program. A non-probability sample was obtained at 5 treatment facilities in MI and the cortisol levels collected on a single day at 8am, noon, 1600 and 2000. Additionally, perceived chronic stress was determined with the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Childhood Adversity Checklist and Stressful Life Event Checklist. There was equal participation by males and females, yet only 75% participated in this portion of the study. Using paired t-tests, there was the usual pattern of higher morning cortisols and lower pm values. There were no age or gender differences for any timed value of cortisol level. There were no significant correlations between the major study variables of chronic stress and any of the timed cortisol levels, despite the presence of perceived chronic stress. There was a significant and positive correlation between the 0800 cortisol level and social support (r=.30, p=.03). These results suggest that salivary cortisol can be used to determine a biological measure of stress with a TBI sample and provides baseline data about the properties of cortisol after TBI. AN: MN030319</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:08:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:08:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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