Variations of Social Cognitive Variables Across Stages of Readiness for Exercise among Blue-collar Workers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159576
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Variations of Social Cognitive Variables Across Stages of Readiness for Exercise among Blue-collar Workers
Abstract:
Variations of Social Cognitive Variables Across Stages of Readiness for Exercise among Blue-collar Workers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Blue, Carolyn
Contact Address:SON, 1337 Johnson Hall, 502 N. University St, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-2069, USA
Co-Authors:David R. Black
Background: Physical activity is one of the most recognized behaviors for preventing chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes; yet blue-collar workers, in comparison to other workers, are at the highest risk for chronic illnesses because of inactivity. Purpose: This observational cross-sectional study explored the relationships between Theory of Planned Behavior constructs, self-efficacy, and stage of readiness for exercise and identified variables that differentiated stages of readiness to exercise. Methods: The sample of 468 blue-collar workers (88.5% response rate) was from a large Midwestern university. Participants were primarily men (75.9%) who were married (65.6%) and Caucasian (94.5%). Their M age was 43.2 years (SD=10.9) and 9.6% did not graduate from high school, 41.5% were high school graduates, and 48.9% reported education beyond high school. Workers were given a validated self-administered questionnaire to measure attitude, subjective norm, perceived control, self-efficacy, and stage of readiness. Results: Structural equation modeling showed significant relationships between self-efficacy and attitude and perceived behavioral control, respectively. Self-efficacy had the most influence on stage of readiness. Attitude, subjective norm, and perceived control were subjugated to self-efficacy. Analyses of variance showed scores for attitude, subjective norm, perceived control, and self-efficacy were significantly different as a function of stage. Post hoc tests revealed significant mean differences in belief variables between adjacent stages. Conclusions: Self-efficacy was the strongest explanatory variable of workers’ stage of readiness for exercise. Findings support the premise that attitude, being comprised of outcome expectancies, would depend largely on a person’s self-efficacy to perform a behavior, and perceived control may arise from the perception of one’s capabilities. Findings provide information relevant to messages that might be helpful in planning and conducting interventions to move persons in one stage of readiness for exercise to the next. AN: MN030379
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVariations of Social Cognitive Variables Across Stages of Readiness for Exercise among Blue-collar Workersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159576-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Variations of Social Cognitive Variables Across Stages of Readiness for Exercise among Blue-collar Workers </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blue, Carolyn</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1337 Johnson Hall, 502 N. University St, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-2069, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">David R. Black </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Physical activity is one of the most recognized behaviors for preventing chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes; yet blue-collar workers, in comparison to other workers, are at the highest risk for chronic illnesses because of inactivity. Purpose: This observational cross-sectional study explored the relationships between Theory of Planned Behavior constructs, self-efficacy, and stage of readiness for exercise and identified variables that differentiated stages of readiness to exercise. Methods: The sample of 468 blue-collar workers (88.5% response rate) was from a large Midwestern university. Participants were primarily men (75.9%) who were married (65.6%) and Caucasian (94.5%). Their M age was 43.2 years (SD=10.9) and 9.6% did not graduate from high school, 41.5% were high school graduates, and 48.9% reported education beyond high school. Workers were given a validated self-administered questionnaire to measure attitude, subjective norm, perceived control, self-efficacy, and stage of readiness. Results: Structural equation modeling showed significant relationships between self-efficacy and attitude and perceived behavioral control, respectively. Self-efficacy had the most influence on stage of readiness. Attitude, subjective norm, and perceived control were subjugated to self-efficacy. Analyses of variance showed scores for attitude, subjective norm, perceived control, and self-efficacy were significantly different as a function of stage. Post hoc tests revealed significant mean differences in belief variables between adjacent stages. Conclusions: Self-efficacy was the strongest explanatory variable of workers&rsquo; stage of readiness for exercise. Findings support the premise that attitude, being comprised of outcome expectancies, would depend largely on a person&rsquo;s self-efficacy to perform a behavior, and perceived control may arise from the perception of one&rsquo;s capabilities. Findings provide information relevant to messages that might be helpful in planning and conducting interventions to move persons in one stage of readiness for exercise to the next. AN: MN030379 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:08:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:08:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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