2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159578
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parent-Child Transfer of Responsibility for Asthma Management
Abstract:
Parent-Child Transfer of Responsibility for Asthma Management
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Buford, Terry
Contact Address:SON, 2220 Holmes Road, Kansas City, MO, 64068, USA
Purpose: To explore the process of transfer of responsibility for asthma management from parents to their school-age children Subjects: Participants included 11 mothers, 2 fathers, 1 grandmother and their 14 children who were between 8 and 13 years old (x=9.8 years). Thirteen of the children were on daily asthma medications, with 64% having moderately severe asthma. Method: The study followed grounded theory procedures outlined by Strauss and Corbin (1998). Data were collected using separate in-depth interviews with the child and adult, with follow-up as needed to clarify findings. Field notes and memos supplemented the interviews. Results: A process model for transfer of responsibility, including defined stages and transition points, emerged from the data. The transfer process was embedded within the central concept of Controlling the Situation. Prior to beginning transfer of responsibility, families experienced an Out of Control stage when the child’s asthma dominated their lives and they sought to understand how best to care for their children. Transfer began during an Autopilot stage, where families experienced the child’s asthma as a part of daily life. During this phase, mothers began functioning as active participants to control the situation as they defined it. This usually included preventive therapy, but for some families it meant only teaching the children to accept limitations and to manage exacerbations. Transitions in responsibility for asthma management were consistently linked to anticipated or actual separation from the child, the child’s desire for more independence, or specific advice by health care providers. The family’s definition of asthma control determined what responsibilities the adult felt it was important for the child to assume. Conclusions: Further research should focus on testing and refining the model using longitudinal designs so that the process within individual families can be observed. AN: MN030254
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParent-Child Transfer of Responsibility for Asthma Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159578-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parent-Child Transfer of Responsibility for Asthma Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buford, Terry</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 2220 Holmes Road, Kansas City, MO, 64068, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To explore the process of transfer of responsibility for asthma management from parents to their school-age children Subjects: Participants included 11 mothers, 2 fathers, 1 grandmother and their 14 children who were between 8 and 13 years old (x=9.8 years). Thirteen of the children were on daily asthma medications, with 64% having moderately severe asthma. Method: The study followed grounded theory procedures outlined by Strauss and Corbin (1998). Data were collected using separate in-depth interviews with the child and adult, with follow-up as needed to clarify findings. Field notes and memos supplemented the interviews. Results: A process model for transfer of responsibility, including defined stages and transition points, emerged from the data. The transfer process was embedded within the central concept of Controlling the Situation. Prior to beginning transfer of responsibility, families experienced an Out of Control stage when the child&rsquo;s asthma dominated their lives and they sought to understand how best to care for their children. Transfer began during an Autopilot stage, where families experienced the child&rsquo;s asthma as a part of daily life. During this phase, mothers began functioning as active participants to control the situation as they defined it. This usually included preventive therapy, but for some families it meant only teaching the children to accept limitations and to manage exacerbations. Transitions in responsibility for asthma management were consistently linked to anticipated or actual separation from the child, the child&rsquo;s desire for more independence, or specific advice by health care providers. The family&rsquo;s definition of asthma control determined what responsibilities the adult felt it was important for the child to assume. Conclusions: Further research should focus on testing and refining the model using longitudinal designs so that the process within individual families can be observed. AN: MN030254 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:08:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:08:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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