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Virginia Henderson International Nursing e-Repository > Registry of Nursing Research Conference Abstracts > MNRS - Midwest Nursing Research Society > Individual Resilience, Family Hardiness, and Perceived Stress in Midlife Immigrant Women

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159585
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Type: Presentation
Title: Individual Resilience, Family Hardiness, and Perceived Stress in Midlife Immigrant Women
Abstract: 
Individual Resilience, Family Hardiness, and Perceived Stress in Midlife Immigrant Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Choi, Michelle
Contact Address:School of Public Health, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Arlene Miller; Peggy Chandler
The purpose of this study is to examine relationships among individual resilience, family hardiness, and perceived stress in midlife immigrant women from the former Soviet Union (FSU). Immigration presents significant challenges to psychological well-being caused by changes in individual and family resources. Examining factors that contribute to mental health enables researchers to develop family interventions that support existing strengths. This is a secondary analysis of 222 volunteer women aged 40-70 from the FSU who participated in a study of acculturation and health behaviors. Participants lived in the Chicago and Milwaukee metropolitan areas and immigrated within the past eight years. Resilience was measured by a modification of Wagnild and Young’s Resilience Scale (RS). Family Hardiness Index (FHI) (McCubbin et al.) and Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) were also used. A weak positive correlation between the RS and FHI suggests that individual resilience and family hardiness are related but different constructs. Length of stay in US was not significantly related to individual resilience, family hardiness, or perceived stress. Age at interview was negatively associated with family hardiness and positively associated with perceived stress. Women with lower family hardiness scores tended report higher stress scores. A statistically significant, negative correlation was also found between individual resilience and perceived stress. Age at interview, time in US, family hardiness, and perceived stress explained 18.6% of the variation in resilience scores, but only perceived stress was a significant contributor. Women with higher perceived stress had lower resilience scores. Age at interview, time in US, individual resilience, and perceived stress explained 22.1% of the variation in family hardiness, with age and perceived stress being significant contributors. Older women and those with higher perceived stress had lower family hardiness scores. Findings suggest individual resilience and family hardiness may decrease perceived stress in midlife immigrant women. AN: MN030025
Repository Posting Date: 26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication: 17-Oct-2011
Sponsors: Midwest Nursing Research Society
Appears in Collections: MNRS - Midwest Nursing Research Society

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