2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159586
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Negotiation of Informal Dyadic Care Identity
Abstract:
Negotiation of Informal Dyadic Care Identity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Coeling, Harriet
Contact Address:CON, 113 Henderson, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA
Co-Authors:Diana L. Biordi
PURPOSE: Historically, informal caregiving research has studied the care giver (CG) and care receiver (CR) separately, with more emphasis on the CG. Our research is one of the first studies to analyze informal caregiving from a total dyadic (CG/CR ) perspective, using the informal care dyad as the unit of analysis. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: This study builds on recent caregiving literature, Biordi's conceptualization of the clinical dyad as a single unit, and Social Process Negotiation Theory. SUBJECTS: The sample for this qualitative study, part of a larger study of 60 care dyads and their use of respite care, included 60 informal CGs and their (60) elderly CRs. METHOD: CGs and CRs were interviewed in their homes, with one researcher interviewing the CG while another researcher interviewed the CR. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Data illustrate how a care dyadic identity is established as rules for the care situation are negotiated, and how acceptance of the rules gives structure to the care process. Learning, negotiation ease, and renegotiation influence this structuring. Three archetypes of dyadic relationships identified range from immersion in the care process, to retention of personal identities, to rejection of the care roles. CONCLUSIONS: In this analysis we conceptualized a theory of CG and CR Dyadic Relationships, postulating that a mutually agreed-upon care dyadic identity facilitates the informal care process. Failure to agree upon these dyadic rules may result in strain in this process. Given the importance of negotiation in dyadic care relationships, we encourage nurses to assist CGs and CRs in developing negotiation skills. More research is needed to illustrate, substantiate, and expand this theory of CG and CR Dyadic Relationships and to examine the linkages between negotiated processes and outcomes. AN: MN030232
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNegotiation of Informal Dyadic Care Identityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159586-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Negotiation of Informal Dyadic Care Identity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coeling, Harriet</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 113 Henderson, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Diana L. Biordi</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: Historically, informal caregiving research has studied the care giver (CG) and care receiver (CR) separately, with more emphasis on the CG. Our research is one of the first studies to analyze informal caregiving from a total dyadic (CG/CR ) perspective, using the informal care dyad as the unit of analysis. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: This study builds on recent caregiving literature, Biordi's conceptualization of the clinical dyad as a single unit, and Social Process Negotiation Theory. SUBJECTS: The sample for this qualitative study, part of a larger study of 60 care dyads and their use of respite care, included 60 informal CGs and their (60) elderly CRs. METHOD: CGs and CRs were interviewed in their homes, with one researcher interviewing the CG while another researcher interviewed the CR. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Data illustrate how a care dyadic identity is established as rules for the care situation are negotiated, and how acceptance of the rules gives structure to the care process. Learning, negotiation ease, and renegotiation influence this structuring. Three archetypes of dyadic relationships identified range from immersion in the care process, to retention of personal identities, to rejection of the care roles. CONCLUSIONS: In this analysis we conceptualized a theory of CG and CR Dyadic Relationships, postulating that a mutually agreed-upon care dyadic identity facilitates the informal care process. Failure to agree upon these dyadic rules may result in strain in this process. Given the importance of negotiation in dyadic care relationships, we encourage nurses to assist CGs and CRs in developing negotiation skills. More research is needed to illustrate, substantiate, and expand this theory of CG and CR Dyadic Relationships and to examine the linkages between negotiated processes and outcomes. AN: MN030232 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:09:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:09:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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