2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159587
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using research methods to develop and validate chief nurse executive competencies
Abstract:
Using research methods to develop and validate chief nurse executive competencies
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Connelly, Lynne
Contact Address:SON, 8507 Eaglecrest Blvd, San Antonio, TX, 78239, USA
Co-Authors:Teresa Weaver
To operate successfully as a Chief Nurse Executive (CNE), specific competencies are needed. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the “Military Chief Nurse Executive Competency Survey,” based on prior work done in the civilian community (Goodrich, 1981; Hansen, 1994; Porter-O’Grady, 1983) and preliminary work of the PI. To identify competencies different from civilian CNEs, the researchers interviewed a group of Army CNEs using qualitative research methods. Then, the research team developed the competencies based on review of the literature, the CNE interviews, and discussion among experts. Content validity testing was conducted with an expert panel and the final product is a comprehensive document of 17 categories of competencies, performance criteria, and behavioral examples written to reflect current standards for competencies (Synder, 1998). All final competency statements and performance criteria received CVI ratings of .83 or greater (Lynn, 1986) to remain in the document. After a pilot test was completed, the validation study was conducted. All current Army CNEs were asked to participate during a Strategic Issues Conference with 25 out of 34 returned (74% response rate). Demographics were: Females: 21 (87.5%) Male: 3 (12.5%); average age: 48 years (Range 37-57); all had master’s degrees with one PhD; an average of 2.96 years as CNE (.5-7); and an average of 26.87 years nursing experience (Range 20-36). Findings: All competency and performance criteria statements were rated Essential or Important (4-point scale) to CNE performance. Assignment of category: Essential: 2.5-3.0; Important: 1.5-2.49; Low Importance: .50-1.49; and Unimportant: .00-.49. These competencies can be used to develop developmental programs for military nurses and to document executive skills for nurses. In the future, we plan to survey Hospital Commanders & Deputy Chief Nurses to compare findings with the CNEs. AN: MN030374
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing research methods to develop and validate chief nurse executive competenciesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159587-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using research methods to develop and validate chief nurse executive competencies </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Connelly, Lynne</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 8507 Eaglecrest Blvd, San Antonio, TX, 78239, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Teresa Weaver</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">To operate successfully as a Chief Nurse Executive (CNE), specific competencies are needed. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the &ldquo;Military Chief Nurse Executive Competency Survey,&rdquo; based on prior work done in the civilian community (Goodrich, 1981; Hansen, 1994; Porter-O&rsquo;Grady, 1983) and preliminary work of the PI. To identify competencies different from civilian CNEs, the researchers interviewed a group of Army CNEs using qualitative research methods. Then, the research team developed the competencies based on review of the literature, the CNE interviews, and discussion among experts. Content validity testing was conducted with an expert panel and the final product is a comprehensive document of 17 categories of competencies, performance criteria, and behavioral examples written to reflect current standards for competencies (Synder, 1998). All final competency statements and performance criteria received CVI ratings of .83 or greater (Lynn, 1986) to remain in the document. After a pilot test was completed, the validation study was conducted. All current Army CNEs were asked to participate during a Strategic Issues Conference with 25 out of 34 returned (74% response rate). Demographics were: Females: 21 (87.5%) Male: 3 (12.5%); average age: 48 years (Range 37-57); all had master&rsquo;s degrees with one PhD; an average of 2.96 years as CNE (.5-7); and an average of 26.87 years nursing experience (Range 20-36). Findings: All competency and performance criteria statements were rated Essential or Important (4-point scale) to CNE performance. Assignment of category: Essential: 2.5-3.0; Important: 1.5-2.49; Low Importance: .50-1.49; and Unimportant: .00-.49. These competencies can be used to develop developmental programs for military nurses and to document executive skills for nurses. In the future, we plan to survey Hospital Commanders &amp; Deputy Chief Nurses to compare findings with the CNEs. AN: MN030374 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:09:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:09:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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