2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159590
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Privacy and Confidentiality of Patient Health Information
Abstract:
Privacy and Confidentiality of Patient Health Information
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Dahlstrom, Glenda
Contact Address:Department of Nursing Science, 103 Elliff Hall, 820 Chestnut, PO Box 29, Jefferson City, MO, 65102-0029, USA
Co-Authors:Roxanne Mc Daniel
Key words: Privacy, Confidentiality, Health Information The theoretical foundation of this study was based on Kohlberg’s work and the two major ethical theories of utilitarianism and deontology A descriptive correlational research study was designed to investigate factors associated with registered nurses (RNs) gaining access to patient health information without a need to know. Using an instrument developed specifically for this research, data were collected from 300 randomly chosen RNs in the state of Missouri. One hundred and seventy-five RNs between the ages of 22 and 75 (X=45.96) returned the questionnaire. The years of experience as an RN ranged from 2-50 years (X=18.29). One hundred twenty-eight (73.1%) of the sample indicated that they did access patient health information without a need to know. Forty-seven (26.9%) indicated that they did not access patient health information without a need to know. The only deterrents to unwarranted access were the presence and enforcement of policies and procedures related to penalties and consequences of unwarranted access (p=.001 and .003 respectively). RNs whose primary functional area was administration and whose primary work position was director/assistant director/vice president were less likely to access patient health information without a need to know than those working in other areas of health care (p=.003 and .008 respectively). Nurses in these categories of health care have less need and opportunity to access patient health information. Concern about the welfare of patients and their families may be the reason nurses are do access patient health information without a need to know. AN: MN030280
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrivacy and Confidentiality of Patient Health Informationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159590-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Privacy and Confidentiality of Patient Health Information</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dahlstrom, Glenda</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing Science, 103 Elliff Hall, 820 Chestnut, PO Box 29, Jefferson City, MO, 65102-0029, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Roxanne Mc Daniel </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Key words: Privacy, Confidentiality, Health Information The theoretical foundation of this study was based on Kohlberg&rsquo;s work and the two major ethical theories of utilitarianism and deontology A descriptive correlational research study was designed to investigate factors associated with registered nurses (RNs) gaining access to patient health information without a need to know. Using an instrument developed specifically for this research, data were collected from 300 randomly chosen RNs in the state of Missouri. One hundred and seventy-five RNs between the ages of 22 and 75 (X=45.96) returned the questionnaire. The years of experience as an RN ranged from 2-50 years (X=18.29). One hundred twenty-eight (73.1%) of the sample indicated that they did access patient health information without a need to know. Forty-seven (26.9%) indicated that they did not access patient health information without a need to know. The only deterrents to unwarranted access were the presence and enforcement of policies and procedures related to penalties and consequences of unwarranted access (p=.001 and .003 respectively). RNs whose primary functional area was administration and whose primary work position was director/assistant director/vice president were less likely to access patient health information without a need to know than those working in other areas of health care (p=.003 and .008 respectively). Nurses in these categories of health care have less need and opportunity to access patient health information. Concern about the welfare of patients and their families may be the reason nurses are do access patient health information without a need to know. AN: MN030280 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:09:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:09:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.