2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159593
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advance Directives and Acculturation
Abstract:
Advance Directives and Acculturation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Doorenbos, Ardith
Contact Address:CON, B418 West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
As the population ages and becomes more diverse, an ever-increasing need in the area of community health is that of culturally sensitive end-of-life care for diverse populations. Advance directives are a way to communicate the kind of care that people desire at the end-of-life. Recent research shows that ethnic minorities complete advance directives significantly less often than Caucasians. The theoretical framework guiding the study is a modified version of the Framework for Understanding Acculturation: Cultural and Psychological Levels developed by Berry. The purpose of this study is to examine relationships among demographic characteristics, ethnic identity, spiritual beliefs, collectivism/individualism, and advance directive knowledge, attitudes, and completion. A cross-sectional design was used with a representative community sample of 234 Asian Indians in India, 207 Asian Indian Immigrants, and 229 third generation European immigrants, 40 years old or older who completed a survey. Findings include significant differences between all groups on advance directive knowledge, attitudes, and completion with the third generation European immigrants having the highest level of knowledge, most positive attitude, and greatest completion rate followed by the Asian Indian immigrant group. The results of this study provide needed information regarding the Asian Indian immigrant acculturation, how the culture of origin and contributing new culture influence advance directives. This has implications for planning interventions to increase the completion of advance directives among ethnic minorities, providing culturally sensitive nursing care, and legislation. AN: MN030075
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvance Directives and Acculturationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159593-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Advance Directives and Acculturation </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Doorenbos, Ardith</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, B418 West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the population ages and becomes more diverse, an ever-increasing need in the area of community health is that of culturally sensitive end-of-life care for diverse populations. Advance directives are a way to communicate the kind of care that people desire at the end-of-life. Recent research shows that ethnic minorities complete advance directives significantly less often than Caucasians. The theoretical framework guiding the study is a modified version of the Framework for Understanding Acculturation: Cultural and Psychological Levels developed by Berry. The purpose of this study is to examine relationships among demographic characteristics, ethnic identity, spiritual beliefs, collectivism/individualism, and advance directive knowledge, attitudes, and completion. A cross-sectional design was used with a representative community sample of 234 Asian Indians in India, 207 Asian Indian Immigrants, and 229 third generation European immigrants, 40 years old or older who completed a survey. Findings include significant differences between all groups on advance directive knowledge, attitudes, and completion with the third generation European immigrants having the highest level of knowledge, most positive attitude, and greatest completion rate followed by the Asian Indian immigrant group. The results of this study provide needed information regarding the Asian Indian immigrant acculturation, how the culture of origin and contributing new culture influence advance directives. This has implications for planning interventions to increase the completion of advance directives among ethnic minorities, providing culturally sensitive nursing care, and legislation. AN: MN030075 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:09:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:09:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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