2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159594
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of Caregivers of Long-Term Ventilator (LTV) Patients
Abstract:
Outcomes of Caregivers of Long-Term Ventilator (LTV) Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Douglas, Sara
Contact Address: Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:Barbara J Daly
Purpose: the purposes of this study were to describe characteristics of caregivers of LTV patients and document the incidence of physical and psychological outcomes over a 6-month post-discharge period. Conceptual Framework: none. This was a longitudinal descriptive study. Subjects: adult caregivers of adult patients who had experienced >4 days of mechanical ventilation. Methods: caregivers of LTV patients enrolled as part of a larger study documenting post-discharge outcomes following prolonged mechanical ventilation were interviewed at discharge and again 6 months after the patient's hospital discharge. The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to measure depressive symptomatology; the Overload scale from the Consequences of Caregiving tool was used to measure caregiver overload, and the Objective Indicator portion of the Objective and Subjective Burden tool was used to assess objective burden in caregivers. Results: 77 subjects completed all interviews. Caregivers reported providing an average of 5.6 hours/day of care at discharge and 4.7 hours/day 6 months later. 44.7% of caregivers of patients at home received assistance from family/friends at 6 months compared to 85.7% of caregivers of patients in an institution (p=.007). Changes in caregiver burden, overload, and depression scores over the 6-month post-discharge period were not statistically significant. Caregivers of patients residing in an institution reported higher CES-D, overload, and burden scores at 6 months while also reporting lower physical health scores than did caregivers of patients residing at home. Selected patient characteristics were statistically associated with one caregiver outcome at 6 months-caregiver overload (p=.006). Conclusions: caregivers in our sample were, on average, in the high range of depression scores reported for other caregiver groups. Consequently, the needs of family caregivers of LTV patients must be considered as part of discharge planning for this population, particularly for those patients being transferred to extended care facilities. AN: MN030249
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of Caregivers of Long-Term Ventilator (LTV) Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159594-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Outcomes of Caregivers of Long-Term Ventilator (LTV) Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Douglas, Sara</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value"> Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara J Daly</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: the purposes of this study were to describe characteristics of caregivers of LTV patients and document the incidence of physical and psychological outcomes over a 6-month post-discharge period. Conceptual Framework: none. This was a longitudinal descriptive study. Subjects: adult caregivers of adult patients who had experienced &gt;4 days of mechanical ventilation. Methods: caregivers of LTV patients enrolled as part of a larger study documenting post-discharge outcomes following prolonged mechanical ventilation were interviewed at discharge and again 6 months after the patient's hospital discharge. The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to measure depressive symptomatology; the Overload scale from the Consequences of Caregiving tool was used to measure caregiver overload, and the Objective Indicator portion of the Objective and Subjective Burden tool was used to assess objective burden in caregivers. Results: 77 subjects completed all interviews. Caregivers reported providing an average of 5.6 hours/day of care at discharge and 4.7 hours/day 6 months later. 44.7% of caregivers of patients at home received assistance from family/friends at 6 months compared to 85.7% of caregivers of patients in an institution (p=.007). Changes in caregiver burden, overload, and depression scores over the 6-month post-discharge period were not statistically significant. Caregivers of patients residing in an institution reported higher CES-D, overload, and burden scores at 6 months while also reporting lower physical health scores than did caregivers of patients residing at home. Selected patient characteristics were statistically associated with one caregiver outcome at 6 months-caregiver overload (p=.006). Conclusions: caregivers in our sample were, on average, in the high range of depression scores reported for other caregiver groups. Consequently, the needs of family caregivers of LTV patients must be considered as part of discharge planning for this population, particularly for those patients being transferred to extended care facilities. AN: MN030249 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:09:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:09:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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