Emotional and Physiological Characteristics of High and Low Frequency Exercisers with Heart Failure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159595
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotional and Physiological Characteristics of High and Low Frequency Exercisers with Heart Failure
Abstract:
Emotional and Physiological Characteristics of High and Low Frequency Exercisers with Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Duncan, Kathleen
Contact Address:CON, PO Box 880620, Fairfield Hall, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0620 , USA
Co-Authors:Bunny Pozehl
Exercise has become an accepted treatment for patients with heart failure (HF) yet little is known about the frequency and intensity of exercise on patient symptoms and emotional mood states. The theoretical framework for the study was based on Social Learning Theory. The purpose of this secondary investigation was to compare patient symptoms (dyspnea and fatigue) and emotional responses to a 24 week exercise program. Subjects were grouped according to the number of exercise sessions completed (high frequency, n=6 and low frequency n=8). High frequency exercisers completed a significantly higher number of sessions than the low frequency group (M=5.15 sessions/wk vs. 3.5 sessions, p < 0.01). High frequency exercisers self-rated their exercise adherence higher (p > 0.05), were more confident in their ability to meet exercise goals at the beginning of home exercise (p > 0.05) and more confident in their ability to continue exercising at the end of the program (p=0.05). The high frequency group reported a greater improvement in dyspnea (measured by the Baseline Dyspnea Index) as compared to the low frequency group. Fatigue levels (measured by the Piper Fatigue Scale) declined at 24 weeks for the high frequency group but declined at 12 and 24 weeks for the low frequency group (p > 0.05). Over the 24 weeks, the low frequency group declined below baseline on the sub-scales of depression/dejection, anger/hostility, confusion/bewilderment, and tension/anxiety (measured by the Profile of Moods) while the high frequency experienced an increase in these emotional responses after 12 weeks and remained at or near baseline at completion of the study (p > 0.05). Findings suggest that an exercise frequency of 3 times/week may be adequate to improve the common symptoms of fatigue and dyspnea in patients with HF while not increasing feelings of depression, anger, confusion and tension. AN: MN030054
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotional and Physiological Characteristics of High and Low Frequency Exercisers with Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159595-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emotional and Physiological Characteristics of High and Low Frequency Exercisers with Heart Failure </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Duncan, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, PO Box 880620, Fairfield Hall, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0620 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bunny Pozehl</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Exercise has become an accepted treatment for patients with heart failure (HF) yet little is known about the frequency and intensity of exercise on patient symptoms and emotional mood states. The theoretical framework for the study was based on Social Learning Theory. The purpose of this secondary investigation was to compare patient symptoms (dyspnea and fatigue) and emotional responses to a 24 week exercise program. Subjects were grouped according to the number of exercise sessions completed (high frequency, n=6 and low frequency n=8). High frequency exercisers completed a significantly higher number of sessions than the low frequency group (M=5.15 sessions/wk vs. 3.5 sessions, p &lt; 0.01). High frequency exercisers self-rated their exercise adherence higher (p &gt; 0.05), were more confident in their ability to meet exercise goals at the beginning of home exercise (p &gt; 0.05) and more confident in their ability to continue exercising at the end of the program (p=0.05). The high frequency group reported a greater improvement in dyspnea (measured by the Baseline Dyspnea Index) as compared to the low frequency group. Fatigue levels (measured by the Piper Fatigue Scale) declined at 24 weeks for the high frequency group but declined at 12 and 24 weeks for the low frequency group (p &gt; 0.05). Over the 24 weeks, the low frequency group declined below baseline on the sub-scales of depression/dejection, anger/hostility, confusion/bewilderment, and tension/anxiety (measured by the Profile of Moods) while the high frequency experienced an increase in these emotional responses after 12 weeks and remained at or near baseline at completion of the study (p &gt; 0.05). Findings suggest that an exercise frequency of 3 times/week may be adequate to improve the common symptoms of fatigue and dyspnea in patients with HF while not increasing feelings of depression, anger, confusion and tension. AN: MN030054 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:09:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:09:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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