2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159596
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nocturia and OSA in post-polio syndrome
Abstract:
Nocturia and OSA in post-polio syndrome
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Chasens, Eileen
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 350 Cohn 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.1793
Purpose: Polio survivors now form an aging cohort at risk for both age-related health disturbances and post-polio syndrome (PPS). This descriptive study examined nocturia and sleep disturbances in polio survivors. Framework: Umlauf’s Model (1999) describes the mechanism in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) where negative thoracic pressure causes a false signal of fluid overload which results in a diuresis. Methods: A 34-item questionnaire was published in the newsletter of a national polio support group. The questionnaire solicited PPS symptoms, sleep disturbance symptoms, and nocturnal frequency. Results: The sample (n=584; 69 % women, mean age=62 years) had 27% (n=156) with a PPS and a history of respiratory disturbances during the acute polio phase (PPS hx RD). Respondents with PPS hx RD had higher OSA symptoms (p=0.001) than respondents with only a history of polio or PPS. Statistically significant associations were found between OSA symptoms/ nocturia (r=0.34), OSA/ daytime sleepiness (r=0.58), and daytime sleepiness/ nocturia. Respondents with PPS hx RD had an increased odds ratio (1.55,0 p < 0.05) for OSA symptoms. Conclusions: The results support the model and suggest that OSA and nocturia especially impacts persons with PPS hx RD.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNocturia and OSA in post-polio syndromeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159596-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nocturia and OSA in post-polio syndrome</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chasens, Eileen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 350 Cohn 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.1793</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">e.chasens@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Polio survivors now form an aging cohort at risk for both age-related health disturbances and post-polio syndrome (PPS). This descriptive study examined nocturia and sleep disturbances in polio survivors. Framework: Umlauf&rsquo;s Model (1999) describes the mechanism in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) where negative thoracic pressure causes a false signal of fluid overload which results in a diuresis. Methods: A 34-item questionnaire was published in the newsletter of a national polio support group. The questionnaire solicited PPS symptoms, sleep disturbance symptoms, and nocturnal frequency. Results: The sample (n=584; 69 % women, mean age=62 years) had 27% (n=156) with a PPS and a history of respiratory disturbances during the acute polio phase (PPS hx RD). Respondents with PPS hx RD had higher OSA symptoms (p=0.001) than respondents with only a history of polio or PPS. Statistically significant associations were found between OSA symptoms/ nocturia (r=0.34), OSA/ daytime sleepiness (r=0.58), and daytime sleepiness/ nocturia. Respondents with PPS hx RD had an increased odds ratio (1.55,0 p &lt; 0.05) for OSA symptoms. Conclusions: The results support the model and suggest that OSA and nocturia especially impacts persons with PPS hx RD.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:09:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:09:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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