2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159598
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of the maternal-infant relationship during the first year
Abstract:
Quality of the maternal-infant relationship during the first year
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Chiu, Sheau-Huey
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 206C, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.2438
Mother-infant interaction (MII), an index of quality of maternal-infant relationship, is important for measurement of intervention effects, because of its influence on later child development. Preterm birth often negatively impacts MII during the first year. Mothers who experience kangaroo care (KC), wherein they hold their diaper-clad infants, chest-to-chest and skin-to-skin between their breasts, express positive feelings toward their infants compared to mothers who do not have the opportunity. MII following KC has not been measured objectively beyond 41 weeks gestation. This randomized trial was done to test the effect of early KC on MII at 6-month follow-up using the Nursing Child Assessment Feeding and Teaching Scales. Mother-preterm infant dyads were randomly assigned to KC or control groups postbirth. KC occurred as early, as often, and for as long as possible. Feedings were self-regulatory. At 6 months, 53 dyads returned for follow-up assessment for videotaping during feeding and teaching. Valid assessment was facilitated by helping the dyads become acquainted with the setting before beginning assessment and by avoiding direct eye contact with the infant during assessment to minimize distraction. Between-group differences in MII were not significant at 6 months, suggesting need for longer follow-up.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of the maternal-infant relationship during the first yearen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159598-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality of the maternal-infant relationship during the first year</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chiu, Sheau-Huey</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 206C, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.2438</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">schiu@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Mother-infant interaction (MII), an index of quality of maternal-infant relationship, is important for measurement of intervention effects, because of its influence on later child development. Preterm birth often negatively impacts MII during the first year. Mothers who experience kangaroo care (KC), wherein they hold their diaper-clad infants, chest-to-chest and skin-to-skin between their breasts, express positive feelings toward their infants compared to mothers who do not have the opportunity. MII following KC has not been measured objectively beyond 41 weeks gestation. This randomized trial was done to test the effect of early KC on MII at 6-month follow-up using the Nursing Child Assessment Feeding and Teaching Scales. Mother-preterm infant dyads were randomly assigned to KC or control groups postbirth. KC occurred as early, as often, and for as long as possible. Feedings were self-regulatory. At 6 months, 53 dyads returned for follow-up assessment for videotaping during feeding and teaching. Valid assessment was facilitated by helping the dyads become acquainted with the setting before beginning assessment and by avoiding direct eye contact with the infant during assessment to minimize distraction. Between-group differences in MII were not significant at 6 months, suggesting need for longer follow-up.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:09:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:09:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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