Measurement of serum albumin as an indicator of severity of illness: Measurement logistics and issues

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159599
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measurement of serum albumin as an indicator of severity of illness: Measurement logistics and issues
Abstract:
Measurement of serum albumin as an indicator of severity of illness: Measurement logistics and issues
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Clochesy, John, MS/MSc
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Instructor, Acute and Critical Care
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.0125
Serum albumin has traditionally been used to monitor nutritional status. In critically ill adults, however, it provides a biochemical index of severity of illness. The serum albumin level correlates with morbidity and mortality, whereby diminished serum albumin levels correlate with increased morbidity and mortality. Serum albumin levels are depressed during episodes of acute and critical illness due to the presence of inflammatory mediators (TNF-Ą and IL-6) that lead to decreased albumin synthesis, dilution related to fluid resuscitation, and capillary leak that accompanies critical illness. Theoretical and measurement issues relating to evaluation of serum albumin levels will be explored, with an emphasis on incorporating this measure in clinical research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasurement of serum albumin as an indicator of severity of illness: Measurement logistics and issuesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159599-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measurement of serum albumin as an indicator of severity of illness: Measurement logistics and issues</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clochesy, John, MS/MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor, Acute and Critical Care</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.0125</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmc@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Serum albumin has traditionally been used to monitor nutritional status. In critically ill adults, however, it provides a biochemical index of severity of illness. The serum albumin level correlates with morbidity and mortality, whereby diminished serum albumin levels correlate with increased morbidity and mortality. Serum albumin levels are depressed during episodes of acute and critical illness due to the presence of inflammatory mediators (TNF-&fnof;&Ntilde; and IL-6) that lead to decreased albumin synthesis, dilution related to fluid resuscitation, and capillary leak that accompanies critical illness. Theoretical and measurement issues relating to evaluation of serum albumin levels will be explored, with an emphasis on incorporating this measure in clinical research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:09:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:09:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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