2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159600
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family and community reintegration following a stroke
Abstract:
Family and community reintegration following a stroke
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Coeling, Harriet
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Henderson Hall Room 113, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Contact Telephone:330.672.8787
Literature reports many stroke survivors remain limited in participation in family/community activities and in quality of life post stroke, even after achieving satisfactory levels of independence in daily living activities and mobility. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to family/community reintegration from the perspective of the stroke survivor. The Dijkers (1998) Community Integration Framework guided this preliminary study. Twelve stroke survivors were interviewed using a semi-structured interview format. Six participants were recruited through a local stroke support group and interviewed face-to-face, while six were recruited through an Internet stroke support group and interviewed over the telephone. Tape-recorded interviews averaged an hour in length. Data was analyzed using the method of grounded content analysis. Results: participants expressed feelings of "imprisonment" and "being entrapped in their own body"; they associated this sense of entrapment with limitations in perception (seeing/hearing/sensing); fatigue; and inability to maintain thought and communication patterns. Differences between participants recruited from the local stroke group and the Internet were identified. Researchers concluded that health professionals can facilitate family/community reintegration by attending to these limitations in perception, energy levels, and thought/communication patterns as well as limitations in mobility
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily and community reintegration following a strokeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159600-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family and community reintegration following a stroke</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coeling, Harriet</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Henderson Hall Room 113, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.672.8787</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hcoeling@kent.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Literature reports many stroke survivors remain limited in participation in family/community activities and in quality of life post stroke, even after achieving satisfactory levels of independence in daily living activities and mobility. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to family/community reintegration from the perspective of the stroke survivor. The Dijkers (1998) Community Integration Framework guided this preliminary study. Twelve stroke survivors were interviewed using a semi-structured interview format. Six participants were recruited through a local stroke support group and interviewed face-to-face, while six were recruited through an Internet stroke support group and interviewed over the telephone. Tape-recorded interviews averaged an hour in length. Data was analyzed using the method of grounded content analysis. Results: participants expressed feelings of &quot;imprisonment&quot; and &quot;being entrapped in their own body&quot;; they associated this sense of entrapment with limitations in perception (seeing/hearing/sensing); fatigue; and inability to maintain thought and communication patterns. Differences between participants recruited from the local stroke group and the Internet were identified. Researchers concluded that health professionals can facilitate family/community reintegration by attending to these limitations in perception, energy levels, and thought/communication patterns as well as limitations in mobility</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:09:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:09:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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