Interventions to increase the physical activity among aging adults: A meta-analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159601
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interventions to increase the physical activity among aging adults: A meta-analysis
Abstract:
Interventions to increase the physical activity among aging adults: A meta-analysis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Conn, Vicki, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:574.882.0231
Research addressing interventions to increase activity among aging adults has expanded. Synthesis of findings remains rare. This review applied meta-analytic procedures to integrate primary study findings of research testing interventions to increase physical activity among aging adults and examine methodological moderators of effect size. Extensive literature searching strategies were employed to locate published and unpublished intervention studies with aging adults. Primary study results were coded from each report. Meta-analytic procedures were conducted. The overall effect size, weighted by sample size, was dw=.26 ± .05. Effect sizes were larger for studies that measured exercise duration. Significant differences were not found between studies measuring and not measuring exercise intensity and frequency. Effect sizes were larger in studies with a time interval between intervention and behavior measurement of less than 90 days (dw=.42 ± .16) than in studies with at least 180 days (dw=.22 ± .12). Effect sizes were not significantly different between studies with and without random assignment and with pre-post designs and other designs. These finding suggest future research should measure all three exercise dimensions (duration, frequency, and intensity). Researchers should measure exercise behavior at least 180 days after completion of interventions to detect persisting behavior change.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInterventions to increase the physical activity among aging adults: A meta-analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159601-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interventions to increase the physical activity among aging adults: A meta-analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Conn, Vicki, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">574.882.0231</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">conn@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research addressing interventions to increase activity among aging adults has expanded. Synthesis of findings remains rare. This review applied meta-analytic procedures to integrate primary study findings of research testing interventions to increase physical activity among aging adults and examine methodological moderators of effect size. Extensive literature searching strategies were employed to locate published and unpublished intervention studies with aging adults. Primary study results were coded from each report. Meta-analytic procedures were conducted. The overall effect size, weighted by sample size, was dw=.26 &plusmn; .05. Effect sizes were larger for studies that measured exercise duration. Significant differences were not found between studies measuring and not measuring exercise intensity and frequency. Effect sizes were larger in studies with a time interval between intervention and behavior measurement of less than 90 days (dw=.42 &plusmn; .16) than in studies with at least 180 days (dw=.22 &plusmn; .12). Effect sizes were not significantly different between studies with and without random assignment and with pre-post designs and other designs. These finding suggest future research should measure all three exercise dimensions (duration, frequency, and intensity). Researchers should measure exercise behavior at least 180 days after completion of interventions to detect persisting behavior change.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:09:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:09:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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