2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159605
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hydration: An intervention to prevent acute confusion in long term care
Abstract:
Hydration: An intervention to prevent acute confusion in long term care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Culp, Kennith
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 358 NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319.335.7060
Relatively little is known about the prevalence of acute confusion in long term care (LTC) settings; however, it is thought to be a common problem because of the high prevalence associated with chronic confusion or dementia. Acute confusion in LTC is clearly a clinical nursing problem because nurses in those settings are frequently the first to recognize the changes in mental status and physical functioning that accompany the onset of acute confusion. Nurses, therefore, are in the best position to assess and intervene when acute confusion develops. This study is a work in progress, but we are evaluating an intervention to prevent acute confusion by ensuring adequate hydration in elderly LTC residents. While there are additional precipitants that lead to acute confusion, dehydration negatively influences many of these other risk factors, including urinary tract infections, drug-metabolite serum accumulations, respiratory infections, blood volume deficits and cerebral hypo-perfusion. Dehydration risk factors are most amenable to nursing intervention and have recently become the focus in much of the quality of care literature related to nursing in LTC facilities. An analysis using Cox Proportional Hazard Regression will be performed (n=approx 100 subjects).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHydration: An intervention to prevent acute confusion in long term careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159605-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hydration: An intervention to prevent acute confusion in long term care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Culp, Kennith</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 358 NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319.335.7060</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ken-culp@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Relatively little is known about the prevalence of acute confusion in long term care (LTC) settings; however, it is thought to be a common problem because of the high prevalence associated with chronic confusion or dementia. Acute confusion in LTC is clearly a clinical nursing problem because nurses in those settings are frequently the first to recognize the changes in mental status and physical functioning that accompany the onset of acute confusion. Nurses, therefore, are in the best position to assess and intervene when acute confusion develops. This study is a work in progress, but we are evaluating an intervention to prevent acute confusion by ensuring adequate hydration in elderly LTC residents. While there are additional precipitants that lead to acute confusion, dehydration negatively influences many of these other risk factors, including urinary tract infections, drug-metabolite serum accumulations, respiratory infections, blood volume deficits and cerebral hypo-perfusion. Dehydration risk factors are most amenable to nursing intervention and have recently become the focus in much of the quality of care literature related to nursing in LTC facilities. An analysis using Cox Proportional Hazard Regression will be performed (n=approx 100 subjects).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:10:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:10:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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