Meanings and expressions of caring and noncaring of Native Americans experiencing violence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159609
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Meanings and expressions of caring and noncaring of Native Americans experiencing violence
Abstract:
Meanings and expressions of caring and noncaring of Native Americans experiencing violence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Farrell, Linda
P.I. Institution Name:Memorial Hospital of South Bend
Contact Address:615 North Michigan Street, South Bend, IN, 46601, USA
Contact Telephone:219.284.6512
The purpose of this study was to discover the meanings and expressions of caring, and its relationship to violence with the Potawatomi Native Americans living in a rural setting. The observation-participation-reflection process and ethnographic interviews were used to collect data on twenty Native Americans in the research context of the participants' homes and ongoing Potawatomi activities. The study was conceptualized within Leininger's culture care diversity and universality theory. Current living conditions of Michigan's Native Americans demonstrates that this cultural group is living on the edge of survival,isolated in a dominant society. Many have been separated from their beliefs by the dominant culture and by poverty and discrimination. Four universal cultural care themes identified were respect for all living things, listening and being there, living their spirituality, and all are equal. Three universal cultural noncaring themes identified were disrespect, prejudice, and distrust. One universal violence theme identified was the destruction associated with the use of alcohol and drugs, and the experience of physical, verbal, and sexual violence. Universal and diverse care themes of caring, noncaring, and violence were manifested in this sample. Findings from this study will help nurses and other health care professionals provide culturally congruent care for the Potawatomis.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeanings and expressions of caring and noncaring of Native Americans experiencing violenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159609-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Meanings and expressions of caring and noncaring of Native Americans experiencing violence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Farrell, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Memorial Hospital of South Bend</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">615 North Michigan Street, South Bend, IN, 46601, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">219.284.6512</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">LSFnur@AOL.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to discover the meanings and expressions of caring, and its relationship to violence with the Potawatomi Native Americans living in a rural setting. The observation-participation-reflection process and ethnographic interviews were used to collect data on twenty Native Americans in the research context of the participants' homes and ongoing Potawatomi activities. The study was conceptualized within Leininger's culture care diversity and universality theory. Current living conditions of Michigan's Native Americans demonstrates that this cultural group is living on the edge of survival,isolated in a dominant society. Many have been separated from their beliefs by the dominant culture and by poverty and discrimination. Four universal cultural care themes identified were respect for all living things, listening and being there, living their spirituality, and all are equal. Three universal cultural noncaring themes identified were disrespect, prejudice, and distrust. One universal violence theme identified was the destruction associated with the use of alcohol and drugs, and the experience of physical, verbal, and sexual violence. Universal and diverse care themes of caring, noncaring, and violence were manifested in this sample. Findings from this study will help nurses and other health care professionals provide culturally congruent care for the Potawatomis.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:10:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:10:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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