2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159611
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Indicators of gut oxygenation: A comparison of gastric & rectal CO2
Abstract:
Indicators of gut oxygenation: A comparison of gastric & rectal CO2
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Fisher, Elaine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.6125
Purpose. To determine whether the rectum is a more valid and reliable site for monitoring regional gut oxygenation than the stomach.. Introduction. The stomach is currently used to measure CO2 as an index of oxygenation but has confounding factors that limit measurement accuracy. The rectum is investigated as an alternative site that may avoid these confounding factors. Methods. A comparative within subjects design was used to examine differences between gastric and rectal CO2 in 26 patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was the model for monitoring structured decreases in arterial pressure. Gastric, rectal and systemic parameters were measured at baseline, 30, 60, 90-minutes CPB, and 30, 60, 120, and 240-minutes post-CPB. Systemic oxygenation parameters were concurrently recorded. A tonometer measured gastric CO2. An active membrane tip electrode measured rectal CO2. Results. Rectal CO2 was 8 mm Hg (SD=29) higher than tonometer CO2. Correlations varied but were strongest during CPB (r=.25). No significant differences were found between gastric and rectal CO2 (p>.05). Conclusions. Rectal CO2 values were moderately correlated to gastric CO2 suggesting that the rectal site may be a valid site for monitoring early dysoxia. Further study using continuous data acquisition methods is necessary to evaluate these sites.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIndicators of gut oxygenation: A comparison of gastric & rectal CO2en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159611-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Indicators of gut oxygenation: A comparison of gastric &amp; rectal CO2</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fisher, Elaine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.6125</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">efisher@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose. To determine whether the rectum is a more valid and reliable site for monitoring regional gut oxygenation than the stomach.. Introduction. The stomach is currently used to measure CO2 as an index of oxygenation but has confounding factors that limit measurement accuracy. The rectum is investigated as an alternative site that may avoid these confounding factors. Methods. A comparative within subjects design was used to examine differences between gastric and rectal CO2 in 26 patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was the model for monitoring structured decreases in arterial pressure. Gastric, rectal and systemic parameters were measured at baseline, 30, 60, 90-minutes CPB, and 30, 60, 120, and 240-minutes post-CPB. Systemic oxygenation parameters were concurrently recorded. A tonometer measured gastric CO2. An active membrane tip electrode measured rectal CO2. Results. Rectal CO2 was 8 mm Hg (SD=29) higher than tonometer CO2. Correlations varied but were strongest during CPB (r=.25). No significant differences were found between gastric and rectal CO2 (p&gt;.05). Conclusions. Rectal CO2 values were moderately correlated to gastric CO2 suggesting that the rectal site may be a valid site for monitoring early dysoxia. Further study using continuous data acquisition methods is necessary to evaluate these sites.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:10:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:10:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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