2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159617
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reliability of handwashing observations in clinical practice
Abstract:
Reliability of handwashing observations in clinical practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Henly, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612.624.0431
The purpose of the study was to estimate the reliability of rater judgements about indications for and occurrences of handwashing in clinical practice using the Handwashing Observation Inventory (HOI). Generalizability theory was used to formulate the research question and interpret the findings. Twenty RNs employed in ICU and step-down units participated. Each nurse was observed during 2 hours of clinical practice by 2 trained raters during 1 of 2 sessions, for a total of 80 rater-hours of observation. Handwashing indications and occurrences were noted. Handwashing scores were defined as the percentage of times handwashing occurred when indicated. Reliability of handwashing scores was estimated using the intraclass correlation, assuming judges as a random factor. A total of 262 indcations for handwashing was observed by each rater (though the indcations varied minimally between raters). Handwashing scores averaged across raters and nurses were low during both sessions (57% and 84%). Reliability of handwashing scores was high (.93 and .98). Indications for handwashing occur frequently during clinical practice, and compliance with handwashing guidelines is low. Handwashing scores obtained using the HOI with trained raters were reliable, and can be used with confidence for clinical research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReliability of handwashing observations in clinical practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159617-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reliability of handwashing observations in clinical practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Henly, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612.624.0431</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">henly003@tc.umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of the study was to estimate the reliability of rater judgements about indications for and occurrences of handwashing in clinical practice using the Handwashing Observation Inventory (HOI). Generalizability theory was used to formulate the research question and interpret the findings. Twenty RNs employed in ICU and step-down units participated. Each nurse was observed during 2 hours of clinical practice by 2 trained raters during 1 of 2 sessions, for a total of 80 rater-hours of observation. Handwashing indications and occurrences were noted. Handwashing scores were defined as the percentage of times handwashing occurred when indicated. Reliability of handwashing scores was estimated using the intraclass correlation, assuming judges as a random factor. A total of 262 indcations for handwashing was observed by each rater (though the indcations varied minimally between raters). Handwashing scores averaged across raters and nurses were low during both sessions (57% and 84%). Reliability of handwashing scores was high (.93 and .98). Indications for handwashing occur frequently during clinical practice, and compliance with handwashing guidelines is low. Handwashing scores obtained using the HOI with trained raters were reliable, and can be used with confidence for clinical research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:10:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:10:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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