2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159620
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lived experience of oldest-old rural adults
Abstract:
Lived experience of oldest-old rural adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Hinck, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:417.886.4929
The oldest-old (85+ years) age group is the fastest growing segment of the population. However, little research has been published to help health care providers understand the daily challenges and adaptive strategies of oldest-old rural-dwellers who live alone. In this phenomenological study, open-ended questions elicited descriptions and meanings of everyday activities, relationships, and emotions. Twelve participants (9 women, 3 men, all White, age range 85-98 years) were interviewed three times in their homes. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with interpretive strategies of paradigm cases, thematic analysis, and exemplars. Using photo elicitation, some participants took photographs of people, things, and spaces in their environments and described the meanings of the photographs. Findings suggest that the context of advanced age and rural environment shaped daily patterns. Being at home was extremely important. Daily activities were centered on completing self-care and maintaining social relationships. Adaptive strategies to cope with limitations in mobility and energy were evident. Social relationships were reciprocal and satisfying. These findings increase nurses' understanding of what is important and how rural oldest-old adults manage day to day. Nurses can then develop interventions to support oldest-old rural adults who remain in their homes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLived experience of oldest-old rural adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159620-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Lived experience of oldest-old rural adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hinck, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">417.886.4929</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shspfd@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The oldest-old (85+ years) age group is the fastest growing segment of the population. However, little research has been published to help health care providers understand the daily challenges and adaptive strategies of oldest-old rural-dwellers who live alone. In this phenomenological study, open-ended questions elicited descriptions and meanings of everyday activities, relationships, and emotions. Twelve participants (9 women, 3 men, all White, age range 85-98 years) were interviewed three times in their homes. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with interpretive strategies of paradigm cases, thematic analysis, and exemplars. Using photo elicitation, some participants took photographs of people, things, and spaces in their environments and described the meanings of the photographs. Findings suggest that the context of advanced age and rural environment shaped daily patterns. Being at home was extremely important. Daily activities were centered on completing self-care and maintaining social relationships. Adaptive strategies to cope with limitations in mobility and energy were evident. Social relationships were reciprocal and satisfying. These findings increase nurses' understanding of what is important and how rural oldest-old adults manage day to day. Nurses can then develop interventions to support oldest-old rural adults who remain in their homes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:10:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:10:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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