Effectiveness of the hand and foot massage to decrease pain among postoperative patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159622
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effectiveness of the hand and foot massage to decrease pain among postoperative patients
Abstract:
Effectiveness of the hand and foot massage to decrease pain among postoperative patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Wang, Hsiao-Lan
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317.278.6445
Post-operative pain is routinely poorly controlled by pharmaceutical means. Complementary strategies based on sound research findings are needed to aid in post-op pain relief. Foot and hand massage provides potential mechanisms to aid in pain relief. Massage stimulates receptors that activate non-nociceptive neurons. They release enkephalin and GABA, which inhibit neurotransmitters released from the primary nociceptive neurons and evoke depressive reactions within the receptive field in the pain pathway. Both reactions block receptor activation of the second transmission neurons, which prevents nociceptive activities from reaching consciousness. The purpose of the pretest-posttest design study was to investigate whether a 20-minute foot and hand massage (five minutes to each extremity) could produce reductions of pain perception and sympathetic responses among post-operative patients. A convenience sample of 16 patients completed the modified Brief Pain Inventories (mBPIs). The subjects reported a 56% decrease in pain intensity from 4.5 to 2.3 (t=7.18, p<0.001). Pain distress decreased from 3.7 to 1.9 (t=4.96, p<0.001). The heart rates also significantly decreased. The foot and hand massage appears to an effective, inexpensive, low risk, flexible, and easily applied strategy for pain management.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffectiveness of the hand and foot massage to decrease pain among postoperative patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159622-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effectiveness of the hand and foot massage to decrease pain among postoperative patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wang, Hsiao-Lan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317.278.6445</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hswang@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Post-operative pain is routinely poorly controlled by pharmaceutical means. Complementary strategies based on sound research findings are needed to aid in post-op pain relief. Foot and hand massage provides potential mechanisms to aid in pain relief. Massage stimulates receptors that activate non-nociceptive neurons. They release enkephalin and GABA, which inhibit neurotransmitters released from the primary nociceptive neurons and evoke depressive reactions within the receptive field in the pain pathway. Both reactions block receptor activation of the second transmission neurons, which prevents nociceptive activities from reaching consciousness. The purpose of the pretest-posttest design study was to investigate whether a 20-minute foot and hand massage (five minutes to each extremity) could produce reductions of pain perception and sympathetic responses among post-operative patients. A convenience sample of 16 patients completed the modified Brief Pain Inventories (mBPIs). The subjects reported a 56% decrease in pain intensity from 4.5 to 2.3 (t=7.18, p&lt;0.001). Pain distress decreased from 3.7 to 1.9 (t=4.96, p&lt;0.001). The heart rates also significantly decreased. The foot and hand massage appears to an effective, inexpensive, low risk, flexible, and easily applied strategy for pain management.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:11:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:11:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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