2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159624
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of health teaching modules implemented at a nurse managed center
Abstract:
Evaluation of health teaching modules implemented at a nurse managed center
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Alverson, Elise
P.I. Institution Name:Valparaiso University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, LeBien Hall, Valparaiso, IN, 46360, USA
Contact Telephone:219.464.5289
Communities often have individuals and families with limited access to health care due to lack of health insurance and low income. To promote healthier lifestyles in this population, it is important to identify health concerns and provide educational resources. The purpose of this descriptive study was to implement and evaluate health teaching modules, videotapes and pamphlets, at a nurse managed center. The modules were prepared using the preferred learning style framework (Tornyay & Tompson, 1987). A questionnaire was developed to evaluate the effectiveness of the educational modules. Ninety subjects ranged in age from 19 to 61 (M=38.6); the majority were white (86.7%) and female (67.8%). Educational level ranged from 8 to 16 years (M=12.17). Age, education, and gender were not related to their reported value of health. While all subjects believed health education was important, only 48.9% viewed the videotapes and 66.7% read the pamphlets. Use of the different modules was positively correlated with improved health (p < .05). Subjects who used a combination of videos and pamphlets reported the greatest improvement in health (p < .01). Further study should emphasize how to increase client's use of educational materials and the evaluation of specific health outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of health teaching modules implemented at a nurse managed centeren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159624-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of health teaching modules implemented at a nurse managed center</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Alverson, Elise</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Valparaiso University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, LeBien Hall, Valparaiso, IN, 46360, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">219.464.5289</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">elise.alverson@valpo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Communities often have individuals and families with limited access to health care due to lack of health insurance and low income. To promote healthier lifestyles in this population, it is important to identify health concerns and provide educational resources. The purpose of this descriptive study was to implement and evaluate health teaching modules, videotapes and pamphlets, at a nurse managed center. The modules were prepared using the preferred learning style framework (Tornyay &amp; Tompson, 1987). A questionnaire was developed to evaluate the effectiveness of the educational modules. Ninety subjects ranged in age from 19 to 61 (M=38.6); the majority were white (86.7%) and female (67.8%). Educational level ranged from 8 to 16 years (M=12.17). Age, education, and gender were not related to their reported value of health. While all subjects believed health education was important, only 48.9% viewed the videotapes and 66.7% read the pamphlets. Use of the different modules was positively correlated with improved health (p &lt; .05). Subjects who used a combination of videos and pamphlets reported the greatest improvement in health (p &lt; .01). Further study should emphasize how to increase client's use of educational materials and the evaluation of specific health outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:11:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:11:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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