2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159627
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of sexual abuse on adult women survivors
Abstract:
Impact of sexual abuse on adult women survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Kreidlers, Maryhelen, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.6911
The long-term negative impact of childhood sexual abuse on women has broad health consequences. Two purposes of this research were: 1) to describe the demographic and negative coping behaviors of women who survived childhood sexual abuse, and 2) to examine the long-term mental health consequences of the abuse. The convenience sample consisted of 189 women (mean age=37; range=19-62) who were sexually abused as children. In this descriptive study, a structured interview was used to collect information about mental health responses using the Childhood Incest Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, the Symptom Checklist 90-revised, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. When compared to normative data reported for study instruments, findings in this research indicated that these survivors had increased psychological and physiological patterns of distress and low levels of self esteem. Results also indicated that these women engaged in a high incidence of negative coping behaviors, including substance abuse (65%), self mutilation (49%), eating disorders (59%), suicidal thoughts (87%), and sexual dysfunction (82%). Almost 45% of the women experienced moderate to severe post-traumatic stress disorder, and 79% had moderate to severe depression. Implications for therapy for these women will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of sexual abuse on adult women survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159627-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of sexual abuse on adult women survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kreidlers, Maryhelen, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.6911</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkreidler@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The long-term negative impact of childhood sexual abuse on women has broad health consequences. Two purposes of this research were: 1) to describe the demographic and negative coping behaviors of women who survived childhood sexual abuse, and 2) to examine the long-term mental health consequences of the abuse. The convenience sample consisted of 189 women (mean age=37; range=19-62) who were sexually abused as children. In this descriptive study, a structured interview was used to collect information about mental health responses using the Childhood Incest Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, the Symptom Checklist 90-revised, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. When compared to normative data reported for study instruments, findings in this research indicated that these survivors had increased psychological and physiological patterns of distress and low levels of self esteem. Results also indicated that these women engaged in a high incidence of negative coping behaviors, including substance abuse (65%), self mutilation (49%), eating disorders (59%), suicidal thoughts (87%), and sexual dysfunction (82%). Almost 45% of the women experienced moderate to severe post-traumatic stress disorder, and 79% had moderate to severe depression. Implications for therapy for these women will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:11:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:11:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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