2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159633
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multilevel analyses in longitudinal studies: Adolescent substance use
Abstract:
Multilevel analyses in longitudinal studies: Adolescent substance use
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Loveland-Cherry, Carol, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Professor and Associate Dean
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 1154 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.764.7188
Understanding risk behaviors in adolescents requires examination of data at multiple levels. Developmental characteristics of substance use dictate the use of longitudinal designs in order to account for different patterns of initiation and the changing nature of substance use in adolescents. Thus, both within subjects and between subjects variation need to be considered. Adolescents are often recruited through school and variability between classrooms and between schools are additional levels to be examined. Based on analysis of data from an initial sample of 547 African-American and European-American adolescents the results of two approaches - use of intraclass correlation coefficients and HLM - for are described and evaluated. The adolescents were recruited from nine urban elementary schools in grade 6. Clusters of three schools each were created to represent similar racial and economic characteristics. Each group of schools was randomly assigned to one of three study conditions - family intervention, school intervention, control. Since group assignment was by school rather than by individuals within schools, design effects were examined using repeated measures MANOVA, adjusting the F-statistics with relevant intraclass correlation coefficients. The results are discussed and contrasted with the use of HLM as an alternative approach.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultilevel analyses in longitudinal studies: Adolescent substance useen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159633-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multilevel analyses in longitudinal studies: Adolescent substance use</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Loveland-Cherry, Carol, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 1154 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.764.7188</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">loveland@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Understanding risk behaviors in adolescents requires examination of data at multiple levels. Developmental characteristics of substance use dictate the use of longitudinal designs in order to account for different patterns of initiation and the changing nature of substance use in adolescents. Thus, both within subjects and between subjects variation need to be considered. Adolescents are often recruited through school and variability between classrooms and between schools are additional levels to be examined. Based on analysis of data from an initial sample of 547 African-American and European-American adolescents the results of two approaches - use of intraclass correlation coefficients and HLM - for are described and evaluated. The adolescents were recruited from nine urban elementary schools in grade 6. Clusters of three schools each were created to represent similar racial and economic characteristics. Each group of schools was randomly assigned to one of three study conditions - family intervention, school intervention, control. Since group assignment was by school rather than by individuals within schools, design effects were examined using repeated measures MANOVA, adjusting the F-statistics with relevant intraclass correlation coefficients. The results are discussed and contrasted with the use of HLM as an alternative approach.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:11:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:11:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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