2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159638
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Watching out: Vigilance in women who have migraine headaches
Abstract:
Watching out: Vigilance in women who have migraine headaches
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Meyer, Geralyn
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314.577.8946
According to Orem (1995), vigilance is a power component of self-care agency. This study used grounded theory methodology (Strauss & Corbin, 1998) to explore, describe and analyze the process of vigilance in women who had migraine headaches, a chronic condition that requires self-care management. Purposive and theoretical sampling were used. Twenty-two women, 18-61 years old, were interviewed using a semi-structured interviewing format. Transcripts of the audiotape recordings of the interviews provided the data for analysis. The basic social problem identified for women with migraine headaches was the need to maintain function in the face of unpredictable bouts of severe headache pain and associated distress. One way women maximized their function in the face of their migraine headaches was through the exercise of vigilance. Vigilance in women with migraine headaches can be conceptualized as the art of "watching out". Watching out, the core category, had four subprocesses: assigning meaning to what is, calculating the risk, staying ready and monitoring the results. Owning the label and making the connections were uncovered as conditions for watching out. Deciding what to do and acting to maximize function were identified as consequences of vigilance. This research has implications for nursing theory development, practice and research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWatching out: Vigilance in women who have migraine headachesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159638-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Watching out: Vigilance in women who have migraine headaches</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Meyer, Geralyn</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314.577.8946</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">meyerga@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">According to Orem (1995), vigilance is a power component of self-care agency. This study used grounded theory methodology (Strauss &amp; Corbin, 1998) to explore, describe and analyze the process of vigilance in women who had migraine headaches, a chronic condition that requires self-care management. Purposive and theoretical sampling were used. Twenty-two women, 18-61 years old, were interviewed using a semi-structured interviewing format. Transcripts of the audiotape recordings of the interviews provided the data for analysis. The basic social problem identified for women with migraine headaches was the need to maintain function in the face of unpredictable bouts of severe headache pain and associated distress. One way women maximized their function in the face of their migraine headaches was through the exercise of vigilance. Vigilance in women with migraine headaches can be conceptualized as the art of &quot;watching out&quot;. Watching out, the core category, had four subprocesses: assigning meaning to what is, calculating the risk, staying ready and monitoring the results. Owning the label and making the connections were uncovered as conditions for watching out. Deciding what to do and acting to maximize function were identified as consequences of vigilance. This research has implications for nursing theory development, practice and research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:11:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:11:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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