2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159643
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stigma: Types, consequences and management strategies
Abstract:
Stigma: Types, consequences and management strategies
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Muhlbauer, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402.559.6544
Approximately three million American families live with persistently mentally ill members. The private and public health costs are substantial; the impact of stigma produces a component of that cost. This research, a segment of a larger qualitative study based on a framework of symbolic interaction and dramaturgical interviewing, examined stigma types, consequences and management techniques. Twenty-six respondents, all with persistently mentally ill relatives, participated in a 1 ½ to 2 hour semi-structured interview. The study's objectives were to: (1) examine the experience of stigma from the perspective of family members, (2) analyze the impact/consequences of those experiences, and (3) search for management strategies. Analysis revealed the experience of both public and private domain stigma. Private domain stigma encompassed internalized and family centered types. Public domain stigma demonstrated direct personalized and indirect institutionalized types. While all respondents acknowledged struggling with the repercussions of internalized, family centered and institutionalized stigma, the majority (85%) denied having to confront public, direct, personalized manifestations. Analysis also revealed successful management strategies and self-disclosure processes. Information about stigma types, management strategies and self-disclosure processes derived from this research provides support and direction for nurses counseling families on managing the realities of stigma.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStigma: Types, consequences and management strategiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159643-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stigma: Types, consequences and management strategies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Muhlbauer, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402.559.6544</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smuhlbau@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Approximately three million American families live with persistently mentally ill members. The private and public health costs are substantial; the impact of stigma produces a component of that cost. This research, a segment of a larger qualitative study based on a framework of symbolic interaction and dramaturgical interviewing, examined stigma types, consequences and management techniques. Twenty-six respondents, all with persistently mentally ill relatives, participated in a 1 &frac12; to 2 hour semi-structured interview. The study's objectives were to: (1) examine the experience of stigma from the perspective of family members, (2) analyze the impact/consequences of those experiences, and (3) search for management strategies. Analysis revealed the experience of both public and private domain stigma. Private domain stigma encompassed internalized and family centered types. Public domain stigma demonstrated direct personalized and indirect institutionalized types. While all respondents acknowledged struggling with the repercussions of internalized, family centered and institutionalized stigma, the majority (85%) denied having to confront public, direct, personalized manifestations. Analysis also revealed successful management strategies and self-disclosure processes. Information about stigma types, management strategies and self-disclosure processes derived from this research provides support and direction for nurses counseling families on managing the realities of stigma.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:12:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:12:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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