An improvisational model of crisis care for the individual with schizophrenic illness

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159651
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An improvisational model of crisis care for the individual with schizophrenic illness
Abstract:
An improvisational model of crisis care for the individual with schizophrenic illness
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Smith, Barbara
Treatment services reducing symptom exacerbation may improve outcomes for individuals with schizophrenic illness. Although anecdotal information suggests crisis stabilization units (CSUs) treat psychiatric crises for these individuals few studies have been conducted. Study purpose was to reduce this gap in understanding through an in-depth description of a medical center CSU. Qualitative methods and an embedded case study design were used. The sample included nine clients with schizophrenic illness, their families, CSU staff, and staff from two community mental health centers. Data were collected through interviews, observations, and document review. Analysis was conducted using standard qualitative techniques. Findings indicated four CSU roles: preventing hospitalization, "harbor," "gateway," and centralized resource. CSU care process involved information gathering to make sense of the crisis and treatment activities enacting the role. Care attributes included "engaging the team," timeliness, and efficiency. Factors affecting CSU success were structural: "balance and power of the triad," "structuring teamwork," and "emergency room preparedness;" client characteristics: "client clutter," "historical comparison," and "risk adjusting;" and community elements: community resources, collateral information, and stakeholder expectation. Outcomes were tentative and proximal to care with symptomatic, safety, and support changes important intermediate effects. A model of CSU care, using an improvisational theater analogy, was developed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn improvisational model of crisis care for the individual with schizophrenic illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159651-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An improvisational model of crisis care for the individual with schizophrenic illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bsmith9326@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Treatment services reducing symptom exacerbation may improve outcomes for individuals with schizophrenic illness. Although anecdotal information suggests crisis stabilization units (CSUs) treat psychiatric crises for these individuals few studies have been conducted. Study purpose was to reduce this gap in understanding through an in-depth description of a medical center CSU. Qualitative methods and an embedded case study design were used. The sample included nine clients with schizophrenic illness, their families, CSU staff, and staff from two community mental health centers. Data were collected through interviews, observations, and document review. Analysis was conducted using standard qualitative techniques. Findings indicated four CSU roles: preventing hospitalization, &quot;harbor,&quot; &quot;gateway,&quot; and centralized resource. CSU care process involved information gathering to make sense of the crisis and treatment activities enacting the role. Care attributes included &quot;engaging the team,&quot; timeliness, and efficiency. Factors affecting CSU success were structural: &quot;balance and power of the triad,&quot; &quot;structuring teamwork,&quot; and &quot;emergency room preparedness;&quot; client characteristics: &quot;client clutter,&quot; &quot;historical comparison,&quot; and &quot;risk adjusting;&quot; and community elements: community resources, collateral information, and stakeholder expectation. Outcomes were tentative and proximal to care with symptomatic, safety, and support changes important intermediate effects. A model of CSU care, using an improvisational theater analogy, was developed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:12:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:12:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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