Adolescent-Mother Communication Interactional Patterns among African Americans: A Longitudinal Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159653
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent-Mother Communication Interactional Patterns among African Americans: A Longitudinal Analysis
Abstract:
Adolescent-Mother Communication Interactional Patterns among African Americans: A Longitudinal Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Mims, Barbara, PhD, RN, CNS
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:, 6444 Genevieve Road, Ravenna, OH, 44266, USA
This study explores communication interactional patterns between African American adolescents (age 14-17) and their mothers longitudinally. Open communication interactional patterns in mother-daughter dyads are important in reducing conflictual situations. Unresolved conflict between mothers and daughters can result in high-risk behaviors by daughters. This study was guided by a synthesis of systems theory and symbolic interactionism; and used a pretest, post-test repeated measures design. The research questions for this study were: (1)What dimensions govern the communication interactional thinking of African-American mothers and daughters? and (2)What is the relationship between the African-American mothers and daughters over time relative to communication and negotiation? The instruments consisted of the Family Adolescent Communication Scale (Barnes & Olsen, 1985) and the Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS1 (Straus, 1995). Specifically, a principal components analysis demonstrated clearly observable dimensions of communication and negotiation for both adolescents and mothers at 2 different points in time. Scree plots clearly indicated 2 systematic factors in all analyses: Communication and Negotiation. These 2 factors accounted for more than 55% of the variance in each analysis. This analysis was based upon 768 observations (12 items for each of 16 mother-daughter pairs at 2 time points). Six item scales were constructed for each participant at each time point on each dimension. These scales had reliabilities that ranged from .827 to .932 for Communication and from .772 to .781 for Negotiation. A repeated measures analysis demonstrated a significant decline in Negotiation between time 1 and 2 for both adolescents and daughters. This decline was interpreted to indicate: (1) an increasing awareness by mothers and daughters of the difficulty in communication and negotiation; and (2) an awareness of the emerging conflict in authority between a mother who is reluctant to surrender authority and a daughter who is seeking independence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent-Mother Communication Interactional Patterns among African Americans: A Longitudinal Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159653-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent-Mother Communication Interactional Patterns among African Americans: A Longitudinal Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mims, Barbara, PhD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, 6444 Genevieve Road, Ravenna, OH, 44266, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study explores communication interactional patterns between African American adolescents (age 14-17) and their mothers longitudinally. Open communication interactional patterns in mother-daughter dyads are important in reducing conflictual situations. Unresolved conflict between mothers and daughters can result in high-risk behaviors by daughters. This study was guided by a synthesis of systems theory and symbolic interactionism; and used a pretest, post-test repeated measures design. The research questions for this study were: (1)What dimensions govern the communication interactional thinking of African-American mothers and daughters? and (2)What is the relationship between the African-American mothers and daughters over time relative to communication and negotiation? The instruments consisted of the Family Adolescent Communication Scale (Barnes &amp; Olsen, 1985) and the Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS1 (Straus, 1995). Specifically, a principal components analysis demonstrated clearly observable dimensions of communication and negotiation for both adolescents and mothers at 2 different points in time. Scree plots clearly indicated 2 systematic factors in all analyses: Communication and Negotiation. These 2 factors accounted for more than 55% of the variance in each analysis. This analysis was based upon 768 observations (12 items for each of 16 mother-daughter pairs at 2 time points). Six item scales were constructed for each participant at each time point on each dimension. These scales had reliabilities that ranged from .827 to .932 for Communication and from .772 to .781 for Negotiation. A repeated measures analysis demonstrated a significant decline in Negotiation between time 1 and 2 for both adolescents and daughters. This decline was interpreted to indicate: (1) an increasing awareness by mothers and daughters of the difficulty in communication and negotiation; and (2) an awareness of the emerging conflict in authority between a mother who is reluctant to surrender authority and a daughter who is seeking independence. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:12:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:12:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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