Dysfunctional attitude and learned resourcefulness: A predictor of amphetamine use in Thai adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159657
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dysfunctional attitude and learned resourcefulness: A predictor of amphetamine use in Thai adolescents
Abstract:
Dysfunctional attitude and learned resourcefulness: A predictor of amphetamine use in Thai adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Panitrat, Rungnapa
Adolescent substance abuse is a common problem world-wide that compromises personal health and undermines national health systems. Many believe that cognitive structure (dysfunctional attitudes) contributes to life stress, predisposes an individual to depression and substance abuse. Learned resourcefulness is an internal resource that acts as a personal protective factor against such phenomenon. According to Rosenbaum's learned resourcefulness model, cognitive structure is associated with learned resourcefulness skills in managing stresses that contribute to amphetamine use. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect demographic data and amphetamine experience from the 172 males and 109 females. Logistic regression analyses indicated that 30% variance of amphetamine use was explained by dysfunctional attitudes (Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale) and learned resourcefulness (Self-Control Schedule) (c2=88.67;p<.001). Overall correct prediction rate was 83 percent. Hence, dysfunctional attitudes have both a direct and indirect effect on amphetamine use. The likelihood of amphetamine use increases 5 % and decreases 10 % for every unit increase and decrease of dysfunctional attitude and learned resourcefulness, respectively. These findings suggest further research is needed to explore the efficacy of interventions that incorporate cognitive restructuring and resourcefulness teaching with substance abusers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDysfunctional attitude and learned resourcefulness: A predictor of amphetamine use in Thai adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159657-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dysfunctional attitude and learned resourcefulness: A predictor of amphetamine use in Thai adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Panitrat, Rungnapa</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rxp35@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adolescent substance abuse is a common problem world-wide that compromises personal health and undermines national health systems. Many believe that cognitive structure (dysfunctional attitudes) contributes to life stress, predisposes an individual to depression and substance abuse. Learned resourcefulness is an internal resource that acts as a personal protective factor against such phenomenon. According to Rosenbaum's learned resourcefulness model, cognitive structure is associated with learned resourcefulness skills in managing stresses that contribute to amphetamine use. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect demographic data and amphetamine experience from the 172 males and 109 females. Logistic regression analyses indicated that 30% variance of amphetamine use was explained by dysfunctional attitudes (Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale) and learned resourcefulness (Self-Control Schedule) (c2=88.67;p&lt;.001). Overall correct prediction rate was 83 percent. Hence, dysfunctional attitudes have both a direct and indirect effect on amphetamine use. The likelihood of amphetamine use increases 5 % and decreases 10 % for every unit increase and decrease of dysfunctional attitude and learned resourcefulness, respectively. These findings suggest further research is needed to explore the efficacy of interventions that incorporate cognitive restructuring and resourcefulness teaching with substance abusers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:12:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:12:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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